Author Topic: Making of Newton Protocol 4k Intro (rank #1 at Revision 2019)  (Read 1042 times)

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JeGX

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Newton Protocol is a 4k demo that won the 4k competition at the Revision 2019 demoparty. Here is the making of:

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I recently participated in the PC 4k intro category in the Revision 2019 demoscene competition with my entry “Newton Protocol” and placed 1st. I was responsible for the intro’s coding and graphics, while dixan composed the music for the intro. The basic rule of the competition is that you must create an executable or a website that is only 4096 bytes in size. This means that everything must be generated with math and algorithms; you cannot otherwise fit images, video or audio files into such a small memory space. In this article I go over the rendering pipeline of my intro, Newton Protocol.

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Ray marching distance fields are a very common technique in 4k intros as these enable the definition of complex shapes with very few lines of code. The downside, however, is the performance of the code. To render your scene you must find intersection point with rays and your scene, first to figure out what you see i.e. ray from camera and then subsequent rays to lights from the object to compute lighting. In ray marching you don’t find these intersections in single step, but rather you take several small steps along the ray and have to evaluate all objects at each point. With ray tracing on the other hand, you find the exact intersection by testing each object only once, but you are very limited in what shapes you can make, since you must have a formula for each to calculate intersection with a ray.

In this intro I wanted to simulate very accurate lighting. As this requires bouncing millions of rays around the scene, ray tracing seemed like a good approach to achieve this effect. I limited myself to only a single shape — a sphere — because ray-sphere intersection is relatively simple to calculate. Even the walls of the intro are actually just very large spheres. This also made the physics simulation simple; there was only collisions between spheres to consider.

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Ray tracing itself is a fairly primitive technique. You shoot a ray into the scene, it bounces 4 times and if it hits a light the color from the bounces is accumulated, and if not, then the resulting color is black. There is no room in 4096 bytes (which includes music, synth, physics and rendering) to create fancy ray tracing acceleration structures. Thus we use brute force method i.e. testing all 57 (front wall is excluded) spheres for every ray without any optimizations to exclude some spheres. This means that only 2–6 rays or samples per pixel can be shot while maintaining 60 frames per second at 1080p. This is not nearly enough to produce smooth lighting.

Link: https://medium.com/@jerry.ylilammi/making-of-newton-protocol-e9ccde41af30

demoscene - Making of Newton Protocol 4k Intro (rank #1 at Revision 2019)

demoscene - Making of Newton Protocol 4k Intro (rank #1 at Revision 2019)