Tag Archives: Sapphire

Sapphire Radeon HD 4870 Toxic Review

Sapphire’s Radeon HD 4870 Toxic edition features the Vapor-X heat pipe cooler based on Sapphire’s Vapor Chamber Technology. Vapor-X makes it possible a cool 43°C at idle and a 65°C under load. This Radeon HD 4870 is powered by the RV770 GPU (with 800 shaders processors), has 512Mb of GDDR5 graphics memory with a 256-bit interface and has some overclocked frequencies (memory: 1000MHz, GPU: 780MHz).


Read the complete test here: Sapphire Radeon HD 4870 Toxic Video Card

In conclusion, my final recommendation on the Sapphire Radeon HD 4870 Toxic graphics card is very good but at the moment it’s nearly impossible to procure. On its own accord the 4870 Toxic would occasionally reach the level of performance seen from the GeForce GTX 260, but never completely dominate over it.

Sapphire Toxic Radeon HD 4850 Review

The biggest problem of Radeon HD 4850 is that this card reaches high temperatures (70 degrees celcius) even in idle (i.e. not loaded). So manufacturers decided to discard the stock cooler in favour of a better and more efficient cooler. In these reviews, the Sapphire’s solution, the Radeon HD 4850 Toxic edition, is analyzed. This Radeon features a Zalman heatpipe fan, providing more efficient cooling, quieter operation and more headroom for performance tuning.


Due to the better cooling solution, frequencies have been overclocked:

Toxic Radeon HD 4850 has the following features:
– GPU: RV770
– stream processors: 800
– ROPs: 16
– transistors: 956M
– memory 512Mb / 256-bit
– core clock: 675MHz
– memory clock: 1100Mhz
– DirectX 10 / OpenGL 2.1


However, the Sapphire cooling solution is one of the noisiest cards under idle: around 40db. But this cooler does its job by keeping GPU temperature at least 20 degrees lower than a standard Radeon HD 4850.

Reviews:

More information about Toxic HD 4850: Toxic HD 4850 @ Sapphire

More news about Radeon HD 4850: Radeon HD 4850 @ Geeks3D

3D LCD Monitor

Sapphire Technologies unveils a new LCD monitor that uses “a new stereoscopic graphics driver” to create 3D images — glasses required. The driver works with ATI graphics cards to send a polarized image to the dual-layer monitors, which displays a 3D image to viewers with special glasses.


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