GeForce GTX 260 Core 216 Review

The new GeForce GTX 260 with 216 cores or shader processors is available and reviews about this card popup around the web. The GeForce GTX 260 Core 216 has the same specifications than the normal GTX 260 but differs in number of shader processors and texture units.

GeForce GTX 260 Core 216 Specifications:
– GPU: GT200 – Codename: G200-103-A2 – 65nm
– Shader Processors (cores): 216
– Texture Units: 72 (64 for GTX 260)
– ROPs: 28 (28 for GTX 260)
– GPU Clock: 576MHz
– Shader Clock: 1242MHz
– Memory: 896Mb GDDR3 / 448-bit / 999MHz
– DirectX 10 and OpenGL 2.1


BFGTech GeForce GTX 280 OCX Review

BFGTech’s GeForce GTX 280 OCX reviewed at [H]Enthusiast. This GeForce GTX 280 is compared to the stock-clocked GTX 280 as well as ATI’s best offering.

Read the complete review HERE.

The Verdict:
BFGTech has put out a solid product in the GeForce GTX 280 OCX, and they have made great progress towards bringing it down to a reasonable cost now. We do think that it is however a bit too expensive for the value it represents. The GTX 280 OCX does not game considerably better than a reference-clocked GeForce GTX 280, which costs a bit less.

The biggest problem right now for gamers is the games; we simply need more demanding games to see the kind of performance that the OCX branding is capable of. We don’t really have any games, except for Crysis to challenge these video cards.

XFX GeForce GTX 260 640M XXX Review

XFX’s GeForce GTX 260 640Mb reviewed at Hardware Secrets.
Read the full review HERE.

XFX GeForce GTX 260 640M XXX was up to 19% faster than the standard GeForce GTX 260, depending on the program and video configuration. You will achieve, on average, a 10% performance increase with this overclocked model from XFX, which is quite interesting, as it costs around 10% more than the standard GTX 260.

ZOTAC GeForce GTX 280 AMP! Edition Video Card

NVIDIA has recently launched the GeForce GTX 280 and GTX 260 video cards. Both the GTX 280 and GTX 260 products position themselves at the most elite segment of the GeForce product line, so just imagine how much more powerful the GeForce GTX 280 could become after ZOTAC give it their special AMP! Edition treatment. The recent Radeon HD 4870 launch may have shown how close ATI/AMD can get to NVIDIA’s bar of performance, but the ZOTAC GeForce GTX 280 AMP! Edition graphics card has just raised that bar much higher. Benchmark Reviews tests the ZOTAC ZT-X28E3LA-FCP against the GeForce 9800 GX2 and 9800 GTX, as well as the new Radeon HD 4850 in CrossFireX configuration.

Read the complete review HERE

GT200: Nvidia GeForce GTX 280 analysis has published a 15-page article on the analysis of the GT200 GPU architecture, with some words about CUDA and PhysX.

Read the complete article HERE.

The 240 thread processors are split down into ten thread processing clusters (TPCs), with each broken down into three streaming multiprocessors (SMs) or thread processing arrays (TPAs). Threads are assigned by the thread scheduler, which talks directly to each streaming multiprocessor through a dedicated instruction unit; this then assigns tasks to one of eight thread (or stream) processors.


Tesla 10 and CUDA 2.0: Technical Analysis and Performance

CUDA was announced along with G80 in November 2006, released as a public beta in February 2007, and then finally hit the Version 1.0 milestone in June 2007 along with the launch of the G80-based Tesla solutions for the HPC market. Today, Beyond3D looks at the next stage in the CUDA/Tesla journey: GT200-based solutions, CUDA 2.0, and the overall state of NVIDIA’s HPC business.

Read the article HERE.

NVIDIA GT200 GPU and Architecture Analysis

Beyond3D has published a very detailed article on the architecture of the GT200, the GPU behind the GeForce GTX 280.

Read tHe complete analysis HERE.

If it’s not clear from the above diagram, like G80, GT200 is a fully-unified, heavily-threaded, self load-balancing (full time, agnostic of API) shading architecture. It has decoupled and threaded data processing, allowing the hardware to fully realise the goal of hiding sampler latency by scheduling sampler threads independently of, and asynchronously with, shading threads.