Tag Archives: geforce gtx 280

NVIDIA ForceWare 180.42 Add 8 New OpenGL Extensions


Here is the list of OpenGL extensions supported by Forceware 180.42 WinXP 32 drivers for a GeForce GTX 280.

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eVGA GeForce GTX 280 HC16 Hydro Copper Review

For those that already have a water cooling system, this EVGA’s product might be interesting. This GeForce GTX 280 is overclocked (core is overclocked by 89MHz (602MHz to 691MHz), memory by 108MHz (reference 1107MHz to 1215MHz) and the shaders are up from 1296MHz to 1458MHz) and comes with a large water-cooling block, the complete card keeping a nice single slot design.


From Guru3D, this is top-notch product. The most important thing is the temperatures are very nice. But even if the GeForce GTX 280 remains the fastest single GPU based product on this planet, ATI products just offer more value for the money. But if you need features such as CUDA or PhysX, so this card is the right choice. But the US$600.- price of this simple bundle is not really cool…

Access to the complete review here: eVGA GeForce GTX 280 HC16 Hydro Copper Review

CPU Scaling with the GeForce GTX 280

Legion Hardware has tested a range of CPUs with the GeForce GTX 280, to try and determine what kind of processing power is required to power NVIDIA’s flagship graphics card.


The test shows that with high end graphics cards such as GeForce GTX 280, one has to buy a powerful CPU in order to feed sufficiently the GPU with graphics data.

we suggest for those buying high-end graphics cards, such as the GeForce GTX 280, pick up a Core 2 Quad processor while the Core 2 Duo’s are a perfect match for mid-range graphics cards.

Read the complete test here: CPU Scaling with the GeForce GTX 280

NVIDIA ForceWare 177.92: GeForce GTX 280 OpenGL Extensions

[French]
Voici la liste des extensions OpenGL supportées par les pilotes Forceware 177.92 WinXP 32 pour une GeForce GTX 280.
[/French]
[English]
Here is the list of OpenGL extensions supported by Forceware 177.92 WinXP 32 drivers for a GeForce GTX 280.
[/English]

[French]
Les ForceWare 177.92 offrent les mêmes extensions OpenGL que les Forceware 177.66. Le support OpenGL 3.0 n’est pas inclut dans ces pilotes.
[/French]
[English]
ForceWare 177.92 offer the same OpenGL extensions than Forceware 177.66. OpenGL 3.0 support is not included in these drivers.
[/English]

[French]Carte graphique utilisée[/French]
[English]Graphics card used[/English]: EVGA GeForce GTX 280 / 1Gb

– Drivers Version: Forceware 6.14.11.7789
– OpenGL Version: 2.1.2
– GLSL (OpenGL Shading Language) Version: 1.20 NVIDIA via Cg compiler
– OpenGL Renderer: GeForce GTX 280/PCI/SSE2
– Drivers Renderer: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 280
– ARB Texture Units: 16
– Vertex Shader Texture Units: 32
– Pixel Shader Texture Units: 32
– Geometry Shader Texture Units: 32
– Max Texture Size: 8192×8192
– Max Anisotropic Filtering Value: X16.0
– Max Point Sprite Size: 63.4
– Max Dynamic Lights: 8
– Max Viewport Size: 8192×8192
– Max Vertex Uniform Components: 4096
– Max Fragment Uniform Components: 2048
– Max Varying Float: 60
– Max Vertex Bindable Uniforms: 12
– Max Fragment Bindable Uniforms: 12
– Max Geometry Bindable Uniforms: 12
– Multiple Render Targets / Max draw buffers: 8
– MSAA: 2X
– MSAA: 4X
– MSAA: 8X
– MSAA: 16X
– MSAA: 32X

OpenGL Extensions: 162 extensions

[French]
Les extensions des anciens pilotes ForceWare se trouvent ICI.
Vous pouvez utiliser GPU Caps Viewer pour récupérer la liste des extensions de votre carte graphique.
[/French]
[English]
The extensions exposed by the old ForceWare drivers are HERE.
You can use GPU Caps Viewer to retrieve the list of extensions of your graphics card.
[/English]

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EVGA GeForce GTX 280 Hydro Copper Review

Water cooling is the most efficient way to cool the GPU that’s why EVGA has released an overclocked and water-cooled GeForce GTX 280. EVGA Hydro Copper 16 is equiped with a large copper block that replaces the reference cooling.


Read the complete review here: Water cooled EVGA GTX 280 HC tested

Conclusion:
GTX 280 is the fastest single GPU card and EVGA most certainly pushed it even further with their overclocking. In order to make sure your card lasts for a long time, EVGA decided that water cooling is the way to go. So, they’ve made their own water block design made of pure copper, but also a bit heavy. The card is not heavy enough to damage your PCIe slot, but you should still make sure it’s screwed to the case nice and tightly.

More news about GeForce GTX 280: GeForce GTX 280 @ Geeks3D.

[Geeks3D-Test] ForceWare 177.79 vs 177.39 – OpenGL Side

Expreview has published a post about performance improvements of ForceWare 177.79 versus 175.19. From the results, it seems the release 177.79 brings a small 2% of improvement. That’s cool but how the release 177.79 is positionned with another 177.xx, what’s more in OpenGL?

I did the test: ForceWare 177.39 versus ForceWare 177.79 and I benched with oZone3D.Net OpenGL benchmarks. Some of these benchies are rather old (soft shadows and Surface Deformer and we can’t change the benchmark resolution). My rig is: Core 2 Duo 6600 (default clock), 2Gb Corsair DDR2 667 (default clocks) and a GeForce GTX 280 from EVGA (default clocks).

Release 177.39 Release 177.79
FurMark 1920×1200 3172 3173
FurMark 1280×1024 4264 4270
Soft Shadows Branching OFF 6053 5814
Soft Shadows Branching ON 10191 9532
Surface Deformer 7713 7717
TOTAL Sum 31393 30506


From this test, there is no OpenGL performance improvement in this new release compared to the old one. Better we can notice some performance deterioration in the soft shadows benchmark.

As soon as possible, I will update SofShadows and SurfaceDeformer with the same interface than FurMark.

NVIDIA CUDA: One Year After

The hardware.fr staff has been invited by NVIDIA to make a point on CUDA. Since this exellent article is written in french, I’ll try to highlight the interesting parts.

One of the new thing in CUDA 2.0 is, according to hardware.fr, the adding in the CUDA compiler of an optimzed profile for multicores x86 CPUs. Currently, CUDA code is splitted in two parts: one part processed by the CPU and the other one by the GPU via the CUDA compiler.
The new thing is that we can now compile the GPU code explicitly for the CPU in order to take advantage of multicores capabilities of the latest CPUs.

Another new thing is Tesla Series 10. NVIDIA has equiped all Tesla 10 products with 4Gb of graphics memory by GPU (recall that GeForce GTX 280 has 1Gb of memory). This boost in memory amount is useful in situations where dataset to be processed are very large.


A Tesla 10 card has only 6-pin PCI-Express power connector (the 8-pin is optional – a GeForce GTX 280 has one 6-pin and one 8-pin an both are required!). The reason is in GPU Computing the GPU has a lower power consumption because some transitors dedicated to 3D graphics are not used.

The article shows also some practical cases where CUDA is used: financial analysis, medical imagery (3D scans) and password recovering.


Read the complete article HERE – in french only
[via]

BFGTech GeForce GTX 280 OCX Review

BFGTech’s GeForce GTX 280 OCX reviewed at [H]Enthusiast. This GeForce GTX 280 is compared to the stock-clocked GTX 280 as well as ATI’s best offering.

Read the complete review HERE.

The Verdict:
BFGTech has put out a solid product in the GeForce GTX 280 OCX, and they have made great progress towards bringing it down to a reasonable cost now. We do think that it is however a bit too expensive for the value it represents. The GTX 280 OCX does not game considerably better than a reference-clocked GeForce GTX 280, which costs a bit less.

The biggest problem right now for gamers is the games; we simply need more demanding games to see the kind of performance that the OCX branding is capable of. We don’t really have any games, except for Crysis to challenge these video cards.

XFX GeForce GTX 280 1GB XXX: Enough to stop the competition?

At one point of time, the NVIDIA GT200 was thought to be a formidable chip that noone could touch, but it ended up getting tamed by ATI’s RV770. With ATI’s R700 coming round the corner and the current Radeon HD 4870 512MB making the GeForce GTX 260 896MB look ordinary, there are only two options: overclock the current GT200, or shrink it (GT200b).

VR-Zone has reviewed an overclocked NVIDIA GT200-based GeForce GTX 280 card from XFX, the XFX GeForce GTX 280 1GB XXX. You can read the complete review HERE.

The XFX GeForce GTX 280 1GB XXX has proven itself to be the fastest single card on the market at present. It ran flawlessly at its factory overclocked speeds of 670/1458/1250 without problems. Power consumption was just a little more than a reference GeForce GTX 280, coming in at a peak of 410W from the readout of our wall socket power meter. Temperatures were also kept in check, with the card idling at 46ºC and peaking at 79ºC during our load test. The XFX card’s fan behaviour was similiar and not any louder compared to the reference GeForce GTX 280.

For enthusiasts who find that the card still isn’t fast enough, there is still some headroom for overclocking, which by doing so, can rival a CrossFired ATI Radeon HD 4870 setup. As a general rule-of-thumb, make sure you have good cooling to ensure stable operation.