Tag Archives: gamedev

NVIDIA ForceWare 177.66: GeForce GTX 280 OpenGL Extensions

[French]
Voici la liste des extensions OpenGL supportées par les pilotes Forceware 177.66 WinXP 32 pour une GeForce GTX 280.

On peut constater une extension supplémentaire pour les GeForce GTX 200 par rapport aux GeForce 8: GL_NV_transform_feedback2.
[/French]

[English]
Here is the list of OpenGL extensions supported by Forceware 177.66 WinXP 32 drivers for a GeForce GTX 280.

We can see a new extension in supported by GeForce GTX 200 series in comparison to GeForce 8 series: GL_NV_transform_feedback2.
[/English]

[French]Carte graphique utilisée[/French]
[English]Graphics card used[/English]: EVGA GeForce GTX 280 / 1Gb

– Drivers Version: Forceware 6.14.11.7766
– OpenGL Version: 2.1.2
– GLSL (OpenGL Shading Language) Version: 1.20 NVIDIA via Cg compiler
– OpenGL Renderer: GeForce GTX 280/PCI/SSE2/3DNOW!
– Drivers Renderer: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 280

OpenGL Extensions: 162 extensions

[French]
Les extensions des anciens pilotes ForceWare se trouvent ICI.
[/French]
[English]
The extensions exposed by the old ForceWare drivers are HERE.
[/English]

Continue reading »

NVIDIA ForceWare 177.66: GeForce 8800 GTX OpenGL Extensions

[French]
Voici la liste des extensions OpenGL supportées par les pilotes Forceware 177.66 WinXP 32 pour une GeForce 8800 GTX.
[/French]

[English]
Here is the list of OpenGL extensions supported by Forceware 177.66 WinXP 32 drivers for a GeForce 8800 GTX.
[/English]

[French]Carte graphique utilisée[/French]
[English]Graphics card used[/English]: NVIDIA GeForce 8800 GTX / 768Mb

– Drivers Version: Forceware 6.14.11.7766
– OpenGL Version: 2.1.2
– GLSL (OpenGL Shading Language) Version: 1.20 NVIDIA via Cg compiler
– OpenGL Renderer: GeForce 8800 GTX/PCI/SSE2
– Drivers Renderer: NVIDIA GeForce 8800 GTX

OpenGL Extensions: 161 extensions

[French]
Les extensions des anciens pilotes ForceWare se trouvent ICI.
[/French]
[English]
The extensions exposed by the old ForceWare drivers are HERE.
[/English]

Continue reading »

Arauna Ray Tracer

Arauna is a real-time ray tracer developed for game development. Being a real-time ray tracer, it is experimental, and does not yet deliver the performance needed to produce graphics of the same quality as modern games do using a GPU. However, in its class, it is one of the fastest (probably the fastest) renderer. Two games have been developed already using Arauna, both by students of the IGAD program of the NHTV University of Applied Sciences (Breda, The Netherlands).

More information and download HERE.

DirectX 11 to be discussed in just weeks!

Microsoft will start talking about DirectX 11 in less than two weeks. his conference takes place on the 22 and 23 July in Seattle, Washington.

The big feature of DirectX 11 is tessellation / displacement while we also heard that multithreaded rendering and compute shaders are part of it. DirectX 11 also brings shader model 5.0 but we don’t know many details about it.

It looks like DirectX 11 will stick to rasterization as there is no any mentioning of Ray tracing support.

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NVIDIA PerfHUD 6.0 Final Release Now Available!

NVIDIA PerfHUD is a powerful real-time performance analysis tool for Direct3D applications, and it is widely used by the world’s best game developers.

More info at NVIDIA PerfHUD homepage

PerfKit 6.0 New Feature Highlights:
* No longer requires an instrumented driver on Vista!
* Supports GeForce 8 and 9 GPUs
* SLI Support
* Texture Visualization and Overrides
* API Call List
* Dependency View
* New CPU/GPU Timing graph

Modernizing the Quake2 renderer

Jay Dolan recently blogged about some of the performance optimizations he made to his Quake2-based engine, Quake2World. He provides links to various points in the source code to give context around some of the topics he discusses.

Read the post HERE.

Quake2 was released in 1997. Hardware acceleration was only available on higher-end PC’s, and things like multitexture and vertex arrays which are commonplace today didn’t even exist then. So naturally, Quake2’s rendering techniques appear very dated in 2008. Multitexture was made a part of the OpenGL specification in version 1.2.1, and is available on most 2nd generation hardware (TNT or newer). I strongly recommend cleaning up the renderer and removing any non-multitexture rendering paths.

Texture binds (glBindTexture) are rather expensive too, and so to minimize these per frame, you should group the world surfaces by texture before iterating over them. Note that a simple grouping operation is significantly cheaper than a qsort — overall order is not important, we just want to minimize texture changes.

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NVIDIA ShaderPerf 2

NVIDIA ShaderPerf is a command-line shader profiling utility and C API that reports detailed shader performance metrics for a wide range of GPUs.

ShaderPerf wokrs with GLSL vertex and fragment programs, HLSL vertex and pixel shaders and Cg shaders.

ShaderPerf 2.0 includes several new features:
* GeForce 8 series support
* Pixel Shader Differencing
* Vertex Shader Analysis

ShaderPerf outputs the following for any shader that you analyze:
* Cycle count
* Register usage
* Driver-optimized shader instruction list
* Vertex and pixel throughput estimates

More information and download HERE.

Continue reading »

AMD will support the Havok Physics Engine

AMD will add the Havok Physics engine to both its multi-core CPUs and GPUs, but AMD managing director noted that the focus is on CPUs given feedback from gaming developers who like the idea of offsetting physics computation to CPU cores.

Read whole article HERE

AMD is hoping to accelerate Havok Physics on both its multi-core CPUs and GPUs and claims that it’s striving to deliver the best of both worlds. However, the main focus at the moment appears to be AMD’s CPUs. AMD and Havok say that they’re planning to optimise the ‘full range of Havok technologies on AMD x86 superscalar processors, and AMD claims that Havok Physics scales extremely well across the entire family of AMD processors.

Havok’s managing director, David O’Meara, explained the priority for CPUs, saying that the feedback that we consistently receive from leading game developers is that core game play simulation should be performed on CPU cores. However, he added that GPU physics acceleration could become a feature in the future, saying that ‘the capabilities of massively parallel products offer technical possibilities for computing certain types of simulation.

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Related links:
AMD’s physics secret revealed: It’s Havok @ TG Daily

Deferred Rendering in Leadwerks Engine

Leadwerks Software has released a paper describing their experience implementing deferred lighting in the OpenGL-based Leadwerks Engine. The paper includes some GLSL code for reconstructing screen space positions without need for a position float buffer, as well as a few results surprising to the author.

This paper is available HERE – PDF

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