Tag Archives: api

Ray-tracing the way to go for game developers?

TG Daily has interviewed Daniel Pohl, an engineer who is making some impressive progress in ray-tracing research, about Intel’s ray-tracing efforts.

Q: What is Larrabee from your perspective. What is the underlying architecture and the programming model?
A: Larrabee was primarily built as a rasterizering processor. Therefore you have support for DirectX and OpenGL. But it will also be a freely programmable x86-architecture. That means you could, for example, write your own rasterizer with your own API, a ray tracer, a voxel renderer or combinations of those. You could also use it for non-graphical applications that benefit from parallelization.

Q: What API is Intel using to showcase ray tracing demos?
A: We wrote our own API. The shading system uses a HLSL-like syntax that allows you also to shoot new rays within a shader. Using that API the programmer has no need to manually multi-thread the rendering and does not need to optimize the shading with SSE as this is done by the shading compiler automatically.

Read the complete interview here: Intel graphics update: Ray-tracing the way to go for game developers?

More news about Larrabee: Larrabee @ Geeks3D

[English]PhysX on GeForce using CUDA[/English][French]PhysX sur GeForce avec CUDA[/French]

[English]
The implementation of PhysX has been done using CUDA. Thanks to CUDA, NVIDIA driver team has quickly converted Ageia’s PhysX functions. All GeForce 8, 9 and GTX200 will be PhysX compliant. However, one thing won’t be GPU-accelerated: rigid bodies. According to Manju Hedge, former Ageia’s CEO, GeForce 8/9/GTX200 are more powerful and faster than the current PhysX PPU.

Read the complete article HERE (french).
[/English]
[French]
L’implémentation a été faite grâce à CUDA (extension du C pour exploiter le GPU comme unité de calcul) qui a permis une conversion rapide de l’API qui devient ainsi compatible avec toutes les GeForce 8 et 9 ainsi qu’avec les futures GeForce GTX 200. D’entrée de jeu, les GeForce GTX 260 et 280, et leurs prédécesseurs, devraient donc être compatibles avec le subset de l’API PhysX global, comme l’est le PPU, avec une différence cependant: le portage des rigid bodies n’a pas encore été effectué et cette fonctionnalité ne pourra donc pas, pour le moment du moins, être accélérée par le GPU. Selon Manju Hedge, ancien CEO d’Ageia, les GeForce 8 et 9 haut de gamme (et bien évidemment les futures GeForce GTX 200) sont nettement plus véloces que le processeur PhysX.

Lire l’article complet ICI.
[/French]