Recent Posts

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41
3D-Tech News Around The Web / Acer Aspire V Nitro Black Edition: 4K gaming laptop
« Last post by JeGX on November 03, 2014, 05:33:26 PM »
Acer has launched a new gaming laptop with 4K display.

Main features:
- Intel Core i7-4710HQ
- 16 GB of DDR3 memory
- NVIDIA GeForce GTX 860M
- 256GB SSD + 1TB HDD
- 4K display (3840 x 2160 pixels)


Links:
- http://www.cnet.com/news/aspire-v-nitro-black-edition-from-acer-jumps-into-4k/
- http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/acer-v-nitro-black-edition,news-49178.html

42
English forum / User clipping planes
« Last post by JeGX on November 03, 2014, 04:52:51 PM »
The support of user clipping planes has been added to GLSL Hacker 0.8.0+.  User clipping planes are very easy to use: you need a GLSL program that deals with gl_ClipDistance and you need to enable one of the available user clipping planes with gh_renderer.enable_state("GL_CLIP_DISTANCE0").

A demo is available in the host_api/Clip_Planes/ folder of the code sample pack v2.25.0.

This demo is based on this article: http://github.prideout.net/clip-planes/



43
English forum / FreeType-GL plugin (TTF and OTF)
« Last post by JeGX on November 03, 2014, 04:17:00 PM »
One of the coolest features of GLSL Hacker 0.8.0 is the support of FreeType GL via a dedicated plugin. Thanks to this new plugin, GLSL Hacker can now load any TTF (True Type Font) or OTF (Open Type Font) file. I also added a small Lua lib (gx_font.lua in the libs/lua/ folder of glsl hacker) to make things easier.


INIT script:
Code: [Select]
-- Load an otf file:
font = ftgl_load_font(demo_dir .. "data/BebasNeue.otf", 30)

FRAME script:
Code: [Select]
ftgl_begin(font)
ftgl_print(font, 10, 60, 1.0, 1.0, 0, 1.0, "GLSL Hacker rocks!")
ftgl_end(font)


Demos are available in the host_api/freetype-gl/ folder of the code sample pack v2.25.0.

The plugin is available for all platforms (Windows, OSX and Linux).









44
English forum / Omnidirectional Shadow Mapping
« Last post by JeGX on November 03, 2014, 04:00:04 PM »
GLSL Hacker 0.8.0.0 supports shadow mapping with omni-directional lights.  Omni-directional shadow mapping is cool because a light can cast shadows in all directions.  Omni-directional shadow mapping (or cubic shadow mapping) relies on a cubemap and requires 6 passes to render the scene.

This demo is available in the host_api/Shadow_Mapping/Omnidirectional_Shadows/ folder of the code sample pack v2.25.0.






45
3D-Tech News Around The Web / Rendering Fields of Grass using DX11 in GRID Autosport
« Last post by JeGX on October 23, 2014, 08:01:04 PM »
Quote
One thing we wanted to improve upon with GRID Autosport was our trackside environments, in particular the grass. The old system had served us well but it was time for an improvement so step up Rich Kettlewell, one of our programming wizards who set about the task of doing just that.

Below you’ll find a brief presentation which goes into how we achieved this and the effects it has on the game itself. The presentation was given at the Develop conference and while it was originally meant for game developers we hope you enjoy taking a look at what goes on behind the scenes.

PDF: http://blog.codemasters.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Rendering-Fields-of-Grass-using-DirectX11-in-GRID-Autosport.pdf

Source: http://blog.codemasters.com/grid/10/rendering-fields-of-grass-in-grid-autosport/
46
English forum / OpenGL 4 Subroutines + OSX Yosemite + GTX 780
« Last post by JeGX on October 22, 2014, 08:10:47 AM »
OS X 10.10 Yosemite + NVIDIA R343.01: not better!

47
Quote
October 20th, 2014, – The Khronos™ Group today announced the ratification and public release of the finalized OpenVX™ 1.0 specification, an open, royalty-free standard for cross platform acceleration of computer vision applications. OpenVX enables performance and power-optimized computer vision processing, especially important in embedded and real-time uses cases such as face, body and gesture tracking, smart video surveillance, advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), object and scene reconstruction, augmented reality, visual inspection, robotics and more. In addition to the OpenVX specification, Khronos has developed a full set of conformance tests and an Adopters Program, that enables implementers to test their implementations and use the OpenVX trademark if conformant. Khronos plans to ship an open source, fully-conformant CPU-based implementation of OpenVX 1.0 before the end of 2014. The full OpenVX 1.0 specification and details about the OpenVX Adopters Program are available at www.khronos.org/openvx.

OpenVX defines a higher level of abstraction for execution and memory models than compute frameworks such as OpenCL™, enabling significant implementation innovation and efficient execution on a wide range of architectures while maintaining a consistent vision acceleration API for application portability. An OpenVX developer expresses a connected graph of vision nodes that an implementer can execute and optimize through a wide variety of techniques such as: acceleration on CPUs, GPUs, DSPs or dedicated hardware, compiler optimizations, node coalescing, and tiled execution to keep sections of processed images in local memories. This architectural agility enables OpenVX applications on a diversity of systems optimized for different levels of power and performance, including very battery-sensitive, vision-enabled, wearable displays.

“Increasingly powerful and efficient processors and image sensors are enabling engineers to incorporate visual intelligence into a wide range of systems and applications,” said Jeff Bier, founder of the Embedded Vision Alliance. “A key challenge for engineers is efficiently mapping complex algorithms onto the processor best suited to the application. OpenVX is an important step towards easing this challenge.”

The precisely defined specification and conformance tests for OpenVX make it ideal for deployment in production systems, where cross-vendor consistency and reliability are essential. OpenVX is complementary to the popular OpenCV open source vision library that is also used for application prototyping but is not so tightly defined and lacks OpenVX graph optimizations. Khronos has defined the VXU™ utility library to enable developers to call individual OpenVX nodes as standalone functions for efficient code migration from traditional vision libraries such as OpenCV. Finally, as any Khronos specification, OpenVX is extensible to enable nodes to be defined and deployed to meet customer needs, ahead of being integrated into the core specification.
Quote

Press release:  https://www.khronos.org/news/press/khronos-finalizes-and-releases-openvx-1.0-specification-for-computer-vision
48
English forum / Very Simple OpenGL Extensions Viewer
« Last post by JeGX on October 19, 2014, 05:58:29 PM »
Here is a small demo (in Lua) that shows how to list the OpenGL extensions exposed by the driver.

You can browse the extensions list using the following keys:
- PAGE_DOWN / PAGE_UP: to move up and down in the list.
- HOME: to jump to the start of the list
- END: to jump to the end of the list

The demo is available in the code sample pack in the host_api/OpenGL_Extensions/ folder



I haven't tested the demo on OSX and Linux but it should work. Otherwise, let me know in this thread.
49
English forum / GPU PhysX on Linux
« Last post by JeGX on October 18, 2014, 04:07:32 PM »
The new PhysX SDK version 3.3.2 adds the GPU PhysX acceleration on Linux (see THIS NEWS).  I updated GLSL Hacker with this new SDK (GLSL Hacker v0.7.2.0) and I added a new particle demo in the code sample pack:

host_api/PhysX3/Pool/demo_gl2_v1.xml

This is a simple particle/fluids demo that fills a pool with particles:



On Linux, you can start the demo with the command line:
Code: [Select]
$ ./GLSLHacker /demofile=\"path_to_code_sample_pack/host_api/PhysX/Pool/demo_gl2_v1.xml\"


Currently, I didn't manage to get the GPU acceleration on Linux (Mint 17 64-bit). I tested with latest R331.104 and with R340.xx. There is a cuInit failure (I installed the latest CUDA toolkit v6.5.14). The cuInit failure is also present with PhysX SDK samples.

Here are some benchmark numbers with GPU PhysX (currently only under Windows) and CPU PhysX (Windows and Linux).

To force CPU PhysX, just edit the demo file (demo_gl2_v1.xml) and update the line 182:
Code: [Select]
gpu_physx = 0


Benchmark settings: 6000 particles, 1280x720 windowed.

On Windows with a GeForce GTX 660 (R337.50) + Intel Core i5 2320 @ 3GHz:
- GPU PhysX: around 420 FPS
- CPU PhysX: around 150 FPS


On Linux Mint 17 64-bit, with a GeForce GTX 680 (R331.104) + AMD FX 6100 @ 3.3GHz:
- GPU PhysX: not available (cuInit failed)
- CPU PhysX: around 60 FPS (this CPU sucks!)

As soon as the GPU PhysX will be enabled, we should see a jump in the FPS on Linux (> 100 FPS on my Linux box).

50
English forum / Re: OpenGL 4 Shader Subroutines - NVIDIA/OSX bug?
« Last post by JeGX on October 18, 2014, 03:40:51 PM »
I will try to update the NV driver, but I don't know if the Quadro driver will be ok for the GT650M.

Will try also OSX 10.10 asap...
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