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Messages - JeGX

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41
English forum / Re: GPU buffers
« on: February 20, 2015, 07:19:31 PM »
I never tested that kind of code but a code snippet with sub_data_read_1ui could be:

Code: [Select]
gh_gpu_buffer.map(ssbo, "GL_READ_ONLY")
x = gh_gpu_buffer.sub_data_read_1ui(ssbo, offset)
gh_gpu_buffer.unmap(ssbo)

Let me know if you need more help.


42
3D-Tech News Around The Web / New features in Qt 5.5
« on: February 20, 2015, 05:20:45 PM »
Qt 5.5 will be shipped soon and here is a lit of the new features:

Quote

...

- Qt 3D
    - The Qt 3D module is now included as a technology preview.

- Qt Canvas 3D
    - Added Qt Canvas 3D module, a JavaScript 3D rendering API for Qt Quick.


- Qt Multimedia
    -  GStreamer 1.0 support. Note that the default is still 0.10. 1.0 support can be enabled by configuring Qt with ‘-gstreamer 1.0’.

...


Link: http://qt-project.org/wiki/New-Features-in-Qt-5.5

43
Quote
"The rate of Linux development is unmatched," the foundation said in an announcement accompanying the report. "In fact, Linux kernel 3.15 was the busiest development cycle in the kernel’s history. This rate of change continues to increase, as does the number of developers and companies involved in the process. The average number of changes accepted into the kernel per hour is 7.71, which translates to 185 changes every day and nearly 1,300 per week. The average days of development per release decreased from 70 days to 66 days."

...

Each Linux release includes more than 10,000 patches from more than 1,400 developers and more than 200 corporations. "Since the 2.6.11 release, the top ten developers have contributed 36,664 changes—8.2 percent of the total. The top thirty developers contributed just over 17 percent of the total," the report said.

Complete story: http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2015/02/linux-has-2000-new-developers-and-gets-10000-patches-for-each-version/

44
3D-Tech News Around The Web / The Poor Man's Voxel Engine
« on: February 20, 2015, 03:16:59 PM »
Quote
Clearly, this article is mostly useless if you're interested in writing your own voxel engine. The final result is far from perfect. I just want to share the petty drama of my past four and a half years. I for one thoroughly enjoy reading about other people's struggles. Maybe that's weird.

Full story: http://et1337.com/2015/02/18/the-poor-mans-voxel-engine/

Game engine: https://github.com/et1337/Lemma

45
Quote
Under pressure from users angry with NVIDIA for disabling overclocking on mobile-GPUs in the GTX 900M series, with its most recent driver update, the company decided to restore overclocking with its next driver update scheduled for March. To those who want overclocking right now (to make certain games at certain settings playable again), NVIDIA suggests reverting to the older GeForce 344.75 drivers. With the most recent driver update, NVIDIA controversially disabled overclocking on its GeForce GTX 900M mobile GPUs, causing angry comments on its GeForce user forums.

Source: http://www.techpowerup.com/210041/nvidia-to-restore-overclocking-on-mobile-gpus.html

46
3D-Tech News Around The Web / Persistent Mapped Buffers in OpenGL 4.4
« on: February 17, 2015, 09:11:40 PM »
Quote
It appeared in ARB_buffer_storage and it become core in OpenGL 4.4. It allows you to map buffer once and keep the pointer forever. No need to unmap it and release the pointer to the driver... all the magic happens underneath.

Persistent Mapping is also included in modern OpenGL set of techniques called AZDO - Aproaching Zero Driver Overhead. As you can imagine, by mapping buffer only once we significantly reduce number of heavy OpenGL function calls and what's more important, fight synchronization problems.

Link: http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/872417/Persistent-Mapped-Buffers-in-OpenGL

47
3D-Tech News Around The Web / Re: Nim Programming Language Gaining Traction
« on: February 17, 2015, 04:04:39 PM »
Nim programming language homepage: http://nim-lang.org/

Nim tutorial (part 1): http://nim-lang.org/tut1.html

48
3D-Tech News Around The Web / A beginner's guide to GitHub
« on: February 16, 2015, 08:42:55 PM »
Quote
Let's be honest—if you're not hosting your source code on GitHub right now, your open source project pretty much doesn't exist. I have a lot of respect for solutions like Launchpad and BitBucket, but GitHub is still the place to go if you need a place to store and share your source code.

...

GitHub uses Git, which is a distributed revision control system designed and developed by Linus Torvalds for Linux kernel development back in 2005. Since then, it's become the most widely adopted version control system for software development there is.

Link: https://opensource.com/life/15/2/beginners-guide-github

49
The famous "Hello world" in 127 programming languages including ada, basic, boo, c, d, dart, erlang, groovy, latex, java, logo,  lua, processing, python,  rust, x86 (asm), zimbu.

Lua:
Code: [Select]
--[[
Hello, world!
]]
print 'Hello World!'

Zimbu:
Code: [Select]
FUNC Main() int
IO.print("Hello, World!")
RETURN 0
}


Rust:
Code: [Select]
fn main() {
println("hello, world");
}

Cobol:
Code: [Select]
IDENTIFICATION DIVISION.
PROGRAM-ID. HELLO-WORLD.
PROCEDURE DIVISION.
DISPLAY 'Hello, world'.
STOP RUN.

Ada:

procedure Hello is
Code: [Select]
begin
Put_Line ("Hello, world!");
end Hello;


Link: https://github.com/Prithvirajbilla/helloworld

50
3D-Tech News Around The Web / Revision 2015: 120Hz Demo Competition
« on: February 16, 2015, 03:03:51 PM »
Quote
We're excited to announce a brand new special event at Revision 2015 - the 120hz demo competition.

John Carmack, famous game programmer and CTO of Oculus wants to see what nifty demos or effects you can write for 120hz LightBoost displays and is sponsoring a special prize.

Since this is a special competition and no currently affordable projection systems exist to showcase those kinds of productions on the Revision bigscreen we'll have a special booth in the infodesk area where everybody can sit down and watch the demos which will run in a continuous loop.

link: http://2015.revision-party.net/compos/120hz_demo_competition

51
Quote
Right now, even with the astonishing power of current multi-core processors and graphics chipsets, the people we encounter in visually beautiful games like Far Cry 4, Assassin’s Creed: Unity and Tomb Raider lack something in their faces, some spark of humanity. The phenomenon has a well-known name, the Uncanny Valley, coined by robotics professor Masahiro Mori. His hypothesis, first put forward in 1970, was that as human reproductions get closer to authenticity, the tiny inaccuracies become increasingly disturbing. Video game characters look so real, but not real enough, and we recoil from them.

Video game worlds are similarly abstracted. The city of Los Santos in Grand Theft Auto V; the bustling Paris of Assassin’s Creed: Unity ... all the surface details are there, but these are just virtual film sets. Most of the doors are locked, and if you point GTA’s most powerful rocket launcher at any building, the explosive impact will do no damage at all. The computational cost of simulating collapsing masonry is huge.

Link: http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2015/feb/12/future-of-video-gaming-visuals-nvidia-rendering

52
3D-Tech News Around The Web / Normal generation in the pixel shader (GLSL)
« on: February 16, 2015, 01:39:47 PM »
Quote
As usual, whilst working on one aspect of Avoyd I hit a hurdle and decided to take a break by tweaking some visuals - specifically looking at the normals for my surfaces. I added a step to generate face normals in the pixel shader using the derivatives of world space position, and immediately noticed precision issues when close to the surface. I'll demonstrate the issue and my quick fix which uses eye relative position instead of world space, before explaining what's happening in full.

Link: http://www.enkisoftware.com/devlogpost-20150131-1-Normal_generation_in_the_pixel_shader.html

53
3D-Tech News Around The Web / Keep a CHANGELOG
« on: February 16, 2015, 11:35:17 AM »
Quote
A good change log sticks to these principles:

    It’s made for humans, not machines, so legibility is crucial.
    Easy to link to any section (hence Markdown over plain text).
    One sub-section per version.
    List releases in reverse-chronological order (newest on top).
    Write all dates in YYYY-MM-DD format. (Example: 2012-06-02 for June 2nd, 2012.) It’s international, sensible, and language-independent.
    Explicitly mention whether the project follows Semantic Versioning.
    Each version should:
        List its release date in the above format.
        Group changes to describe their impact on the project, as follows:
        Added for new features.
        Changed for changes in existing functionality.
        Deprecated for once-stable features removed in upcoming releases.
        Removed for deprecated features removed in this release.
        Fixed for any bug fixes.
        Security to invite users to upgrade in case of vulnerabilities.

Link: http://keepachangelog.com/

54
Some examples:

Quote
-Waddress-of-array-temporary  :      "pointer is initialized by a temporary array, which will be destroyed at the end of the full-expression"

-Warray-bounds : array index %0 is past the end of the array (which contains %1 element%s2)

-Wc++11-compat : explicit instantiation cannot be 'inline'

-Wc++98-c++11-compat : use of this statement in a constexpr %select{function|constructor}0 is incompatible with C++ standards before C++1y

-Wdocumentation : not a Doxygen trailing comment

-Wheader-hygiene : using namespace directive in global context in header


All warnings: http://fuckingclangwarnings.com

55
English forum / Re: Could not connect to server (04)
« on: February 12, 2015, 09:32:51 AM »
In recent versions of GLSL Hacker, I disabled the internal TCP/IP server used for remote live coding.

To enabled it, start GLSL Hacker in command line with /start_tcpip_server:

Code: [Select]
GLSLHacker /start_tcpip_server

57
3D-Tech News Around The Web / Matter.js: 2D Physics Engine for the web
« on: January 20, 2015, 01:24:27 PM »
Matter.js is a 2D rigid body physics engine for the web written in JavaScript.

Quote
-  Physical properties (mass, area, density etc.)
-   Rigid bodies of any convex polygon
-   Stable stacking and resting
-   Collisions (broad-phase, mid-phase and narrow-phase)
-   Restitution (elastic and inelastic collisions)
-   Conservation of momentum
-   Friction and resistance
-   Constraints
-   Gravity
-   Composite bodies
-   Sleeping and static bodies
-   Events
-   Rounded corners (chamfering)
-   Views (translate, zoom)
-   Collision queries (raycasting, region tests)
-   Time scaling (slow-mo, speed-up)
-   Canvas renderer (supports vectors and textures)
-   WebGL renderer (requires pixi.js)
-   MatterTools for creating, testing and debugging worlds
-   World state serialisation (requires resurrect.js)
-   Cross-browser (Chrome, Firefox, Safari, IE8+)
-   Mobile-compatible (touch, responsive)
-   An original JavaScript physics implementation (not a port)

Links:
- DEMO
- Homepage
- Source code @ GitHub
 

58
GpuTest / Re: How To Use FurMark Test?
« on: January 13, 2015, 10:45:18 PM »
FurMark is essentially a GPU burner. If you can run FurMark for 30min without any issue, then you system is ok (read there's no thermal problem with your GPU). The FurMark module of GpuTest is slightly different from the original FurMark (http://ozone3d.net/benchmarks/fur/).

Try to burn you GPU with the original FurMark and check the Preset:1080 score to see if your GPU runs properly.
A list of Preset:1080 scores can be found here:
http://www.geeks3d.com/20120413/furmark-opengl-benchmark-scores-comparative-charts/

Hope that helps.


59
Quote
C++11 is a major update to the popular C++ language standard. C++11 includes a long list of new features for simpler, more expressive C++ programming with fewer errors and higher performance. I think Bjarne Stroustrup, the creator of C++, put it best:

C++11 feels like a new language: The pieces just fit together better than they used to and I find a higher-level style of programming more natural than before and as efficient as ever.

CUDA 7 adds C++11 feature support to nvcc, the CUDA C++ compiler. This means that you can use C++11 features not only in your host code compiled with nvcc, but also in device code. In your device code, you can now use new C++ language features like auto, lambda, variadic templates, static_assert, rvalue references, range-based for loops, and more.


Complete story: http://devblogs.nvidia.com/parallelforall/cuda-7-release-candidate-feature-overview/

60
3D-Tech News Around The Web / Lua 5.3 released
« on: January 12, 2015, 07:57:17 PM »
Lua 5.3 main changes:

- integers (64-bit by default)
- official support for 32-bit numbers
- bitwise operators
- basic utf-8 support
- functions for packing and unpacking values

Links:
- Lua 5.3 download
- Lua 5.3 changelog

I'll try to update GLSL Hacker with this new version of Lua as soon as possible!

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