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Messages - JeGX

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383
More details on GL_AMD_transform_feedback3_lines_triangles:

http://www.geeks3d.com/20100610/ati-catalyst-10-6-beta-with-one-new-opengl-extension/    ;D

385
The Fusion APU combines an x86 CPU, DirectX 11 graphics processing unit, video processor and other co-processors on a single silicon die. Rick Bergman, senior vice president and general manager of AMD’s Products Group, introduced Fusion by holding aloft a 300mm silicon wafer containing hundreds of the APUs each of which contains more than 1 billion transistors at 32nm.

Fusion APUs support open standards for GPU computing (DirectCompute and OpenCL) and 3D graphics (DirectX, OpenGL and WebGL) and AMD said it is working with software developers such as Adobe, Arcsoft, Corel, Cyberlink and Microsoft to optimize software for its APUs. AMD also announced an investment fund, the AMD Fusion Fund, to jumpstart this effort.

Story: http://www.zdnet.com/blog/computers/computex-2010-amd-demonstrates-fusion-apus/2701

389
Word has reached KitGuru that Manju Hegde, nVidia’s VP for CUDA and PhysX, is moving to AMD. What can we infer from the situation, when Vidia’s own VPs seem to believe that Fusion is the Future?

The former professor of electrical engineering for Washington and Louisiana State Universities, founded Ageia in 2002 and has beed as responsible as anyone for putting physics and GPGPU centre stage in the evolving graphics market.

As nVidia confirms, Hegde has been on a mission to improve game play and Jen Hsun Huang was so impressed with the physics guru’s talents that, after buying Ageia out, Hegde was given a critical role in leading the development and deployment not only of PhysX, but also CUDA.

Full story: http://www.kitguru.net/components/graphic-cards/faith/nvidias-vp-for-cuda-and-physx-moves-to-amd/

390
With the recent buzz around DirectX 11, you’ve probably heard a lot about one of its biggest new features: tessellation. As a concept, tessellation is fairly straight forward—you take a polygon and dice it into smaller pieces. But why is this a big deal? And how does it benefit games? In this article, we’ll take a look at why tessellation is bringing profound changes to 3D graphics on the PC, and how the NVIDIA® GeForce® GTX 400 series GPUs provide breakthrough tessellation performance.

Read the complete story here: http://www.nvidia.com/object/tessellation.html

391
Today's computers rely on powerful graphics processing units (GPUs) to create the spectacular graphics in video games. In fact, these GPUs are now more powerful than the traditional central processing units (CPUs) -- or brains of the computer. As a result, computer developers are trying to tap into the power of these GPUs. Now a research team from North Carolina State University has developed software that could make it easier for traditional software programs to take advantage of the powerful GPUs, essentially increasing complex computing brainpower.

Read the full story here:
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100517111908.htm

392
3D-Tech News Around The Web / NVIDIA and IBM Team Up On GPU Server
« on: May 18, 2010, 02:25:35 PM »
Nvidia (NSDQ:NVDA) scored a victory for its GPU-computing agenda Tuesday with the news that IBM (NYSE:IBM) will be building the first volume server based on Tesla graphics processors from a top computer manufacturer.
The forthcoming IBM iDataPlex dx360 M3 systems will be equipped with a pair of Nvidia’s Tesla M2050 GPUs to go along with a dual-CPU configuration, according to Sumit Gupta, senior manager of Nvidia’s Tesla GPU Computing HPC business unit.

“This is the first time that GPUs are part of a mainstream, high-volume product line from a Tier 1 OEM,” said Gupta, who is responsible for business development around Santa Clara, Calif.-based Nvidia’s CUDA programming language for GPUs and CUDA-based GPU computing products.

“We’ve been talking about momentum for a long time with CUDA. A number of textbooks have now been written about how to program a GPU, whether it’s CUDA or OpenCL,” Gupta said. “This is a pretty good achievement, considering the programming language is only three years old.”

Full story: http://www.crn.com/hardware/224900111;jsessionid=ARM2STP3FQ4L5QE1GHRSKH4ATMY32JVN

395
3D-Tech News Around The Web / Re: The OpenGL Shader Wrangler
« on: April 30, 2010, 09:29:27 AM »
Really cool, I'm going to test it with GeeXLab and integrate it if it works fine!

396

Do you have link ?
I didn't mean you JegX, but the people on other websites who copy from here
do you have the links of these websites ? I'll try to contact them  >:(

397
The benchmark crashes on my system  :'(
Win7 64, GT 240 + GTS 250 + R197.45...

398
P.S: if s.o. knows the coder of "MSI Afterburner", show him this screenshot
Why ? For the unreal amount of memory in OSD ?


P.P.S: those who copy my infos to other websites, link to the source next time
Do you have link ?

399
I'm too lazy to google this demo, do you have a link ?

400
3D-Tech News Around The Web / Difference between CUDA and OpenCL 2010
« on: April 23, 2010, 10:49:46 AM »
CUDA term                                       OpenCL term
GPU                                               Device                   
Multiprocessor                               Compute Unit
Scalar core                               Processing element
Global memory                               Global memory
Shared (per-block) memory               Local memory
Local memory (automatic, or local)       Private memory
kernel                                       program
block                                            work-group
thread                                          work item

Quote
On NVidia hardware, OpenCL is up to 10% slower (see Matt Harvey’s presentation); this is mainly because OpenCL is implemented on top of CUDA-architecture (this shouldn’t be a reason, but to say NVidia has put more energy in CUDA is just a wild guess also). On ATI 4000-series OpenCL is just slow, but gives very comparable to NVidia if compared to the 5000-series.

Link: http://www.streamcomputing.nl/blog/2010-04-22/difference-between-cuda-and-opencl

Also: http://www.geeks3d.com/20100115/gpu-computing-geforce-and-radeon-opencl-test-part-1/

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