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Topics - JeGX

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21
ops-class.org includes slides, hundreds of hours of videotaped lectures, and sample exams: everything you need to learn OS concepts online at your own pace.

Link: https://www.ops-class.org/

22
Quote
I just "upgraded" our home network with a Pi-Hole, an interesting project that implements a DNS server with a known-list of ad- and privacy trackers. The result is that everyone on your network that uses that DNS server gets an adblocker for free, without configuration work.

Pi-Hole: the black hole for internet ads...

Links:
- Pi-Hole: A DNS-based blacklist for ads and tracking for Raspberry Pi
- Pi-Hole homepage

23
The GTX 1050 Ti  will cost USD $139 and the non-Ti version, the GTX 1050 will cost USD $109.

The GeForce GTX 1050 Ti is based on a Pascal GP107 GPU (768 CUDA cores, 4GB GDDR5 VRAM, 75W TDP) while the GTX 1050 is based on a cut down version of the GP107 (640 CUDA cores, 2GB GDDR5 VRAM, 75W TDP).

Both graphics cards will be launched on October 25 2016.

source

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3D-Tech News Around The Web / Time Scale of System Latencies
« on: October 12, 2016, 06:22:06 PM »
Table of system latencies. Nice!



via

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3D-Tech News Around The Web / Windows93
« on: October 12, 2016, 12:17:30 PM »

26
3D-Tech News Around The Web / Lightmap Baking and Spherical Gaussians
« on: October 11, 2016, 02:19:49 PM »
Quote
For those looking for some in-depth written explanation, I’ve also decided to write a series of blog posts that should hopefully shed some light on the basics of using SG’s in rendering. The first post provides background material by explaining  common approaches to storing pre-computing lighting data in lightmaps and/or probes. The second post focuses on explaining the basics of Spherical Gaussians, and demonstrating some of their more useful properties. The third post explains how the various SG properties can be used to compute diffuse lighting from an SG light source. The fourth post goes even deeper and covers methods for approximating the specular contribution from an SG light source. The fifth post explores some approaches for using SG’s to create a compact approximation of a lighting environment, and compares the results with spherical harmonics. Finally, the sixth posts discusses features present in the the lightmap baking demo that we’ve released on GitHub.

Links:

- Part1 - A Brief (and Incomplete) History of Baked Lighting Representations
- Part2 - Spherical Gaussians 101
- Part3 - Diffuse Lighting From an SG Light Source
- Part4 - Specular Lighting From an SG Light Source
- Part5 - Approximating Radiance and Irradiance With SG’s
- Part6 - Step Into The Baking Lab



27
3D-Tech News Around The Web / FreeBSD 11.0 Production Release Available
« on: October 11, 2016, 02:01:41 PM »
The FreeBSD Release Engineering Team is pleased to announce the availability of FreeBSD 11.0-RELEASE. This is the first release of the stable/11 branch.

Quote
Highlights:

-  OpenSSH DSA key generation has been disabled by default. It is important to update OpenSSH keys prior to upgrading. Additionally, Protocol 1 support has been removed.

- OpenSSH has been updated to 7.2p2.

- Wireless support for 802.11n has been added.

- By default, the ifconfig( 8 ) utility will set the default regulatory domain to FCC on wireless interfaces. As a result, newly created wireless interfaces with default settings will have less chance to violate country-specific regulations.

- The svnlite( 1 ) utility has been updated to version 1.9.4.

- The libblacklist( 3 ) library and applications have been ported from the NetBSD Project.

- Support for the AArch64 (arm64) architecture has been added.

- Native graphics support has been added to the bhyve( 8 ) hypervisor.

- Broader wireless network driver support has been added.


Links:

- FreeBSD 11.0-RELEASE Announcement
- FreeBSD Downloads

28
3D-Tech News Around The Web / A Primer on Bézier Curves and B-Splines
« on: September 15, 2016, 04:29:20 PM »
A free, online book for when you really need to know how to do Bézier things.

Links:
- A Primer on Bézier Curves-
- B-Splines

29
3D-Tech News Around The Web / CToy: C live-coding Tool
« on: September 15, 2016, 04:24:49 PM »
CToy is a C(99) live-coding environment based on TCC. Small, simple, no bullshit. Write standard cross-platform code and see the result immediately. No installation or compiler required, download (~2mb), run CToy and play. Ready for Windows 64 bit and MacOSX 64 bit (linux in progress). Ideal for games, image processing, teaching, or anything C can do.

Link: https://github.com/anael-seghezzi/CToy 

I quickly tested it (live-coded the src/sample/triangle_hello.c file):



30
GeForce GTX 1080 Ti specifications:

- 16 nm GP102 silicon
- 3,328 CUDA cores
- 208 TMUs
- 96 ROPs
- 12 GB GDDR5 memory
- 384-bit GDDR5 memory interface
- 1503 MHz core, 1623 MHz GPU Boost
- 8 GHz (GDDR5-effective) memory
- 384 GB/s memory bandwidth
- 250W TDP

- source1
- source2

31
3D-Tech News Around The Web / Raspberry Pi OpenGL performance work
« on: September 14, 2016, 06:36:48 PM »
Eric Anholt gives some details about upcoming performance boost in the OpenGL driver of the Raspberry Pi. Eric Anholt works for Broadcom on the Raspberry Pi's graphics driver.

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Last week I spent working on the glmark2 performance issues.  I now have a NIR patch out for the pathological conditionals test (it's now faster than on the old driver), and a branch for job shuffling (+17% and +27% on the two desktop tests).

Here's the basic idea of job shuffling:

We're a tiled renderer, and tiled renderers get their wins from having a Clear at the start of the frame (indicating we don't need to load any previous contents into the tile buffer).  When your frame is done, we flush each tile out to memory.  If you do your clear, start rendering some primitives, and then switch to some other FBO (because you're rendering to a texture that you're planning on texturing from in your next draw to the main FBO), we have to flush out all of those tiles, start rendering to the new FBO, and flush its rendering, and then when you come back to the main FBO and we have to reload your old cleared-and-a-few-draws tiles.

Job shuffling deals with this by separating the single GL command stream into separate jobs per FBO.  When you switch to your temporary FBO, we don't flush the old job, we just set it aside.  To make this work we have to add tracking for which buffers have jobs writing into them (so that if you try to read those from another job, we can go flush the job that wrote it), and which buffers have jobs reading from them (so that if you try to write to them, they can get flushed so that they don't get incorrectly updated contents).

Complete story: http://anholt.livejournal.com/47610.html

32
3D-Tech News Around The Web / MSI GTX 1080 Limited Edition 30th Anniversary
« on: September 14, 2016, 06:29:34 PM »
Quote
MSI is celebrating its 30th anniversary as a leading manufacturer of innovative PC hardware. During the past 30 years, MSI has earned a reputation for providing products featuring cutting edge technology and striving to create and use only the best quality components.

To celebrate this milestone, MSI has created an exclusive limited edition graphics card, combining the excellence of MSI GAMING graphics cards with a unique custom designed EK waterblock for this anniversary edition. The exceptionally classy waterblock features infused RGB LED lights that can be set to any of 16.8 million colors by using the MSI Gaming App.

At the heart of this exclusive card is NVIDIA’s GeForce® GTX 1080 GPU to provide all the power you need at up to 4K resolution gaming. The card comes fully assembled in a closed loop liquid cooling configuration that is covered by warranty and maintenance-free. Enclosed in the exquisite and sturdy wooden box is a small gift which is perfect for enjoying the latest epic games in full comfort.

- Press Release



33
The CryEngine will add support of Vulkan in version 5.3 (mid-november 2016) and Direct3D 12 multi-GPU support is planned for version 5.4 (late February / GDC 2017).

Links:
- CryEngine roadmap in Graphics and Rendering section
- news @ techreport.com
- news @ overclock3d.net


34
3D-Tech News Around The Web / Vertex Cache Measurement
« on: September 14, 2016, 06:14:08 PM »
Quote
Now that DX11 has given us UAVs in all the other shading stages as well, I decided to try the equivalent for the vertex cache. By “Vertex Cache”, I mean the Post-transform vertex re-use cache. That is, the thing which enables us to re-use vertex shading results across duplicated vertices in a mesh.

Using UAVs in a VS, we can use SV_VertexID to do an atomic increment into a buffer containing one counter for each vertex. An atomic inc is necessary here because we don’t actually know what the vertex distribution algorithm is, and we could theoretically process a given vert in more than one VS thread simultaneously. For that matter, HW could simply be duplicating all the verts. We won’t know until we’ve looked at the results. Using this approach, we end up with a buffer telling us the exact number of times that each vert was processed during the draw. From this, we can directly calculate the ACMR (average cache miss ratio) of the mesh.

Links:
- article
- github

35
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This code accompanies the research paper "Masked Software Occlusion Culling", and implements an efficient alternative to the hierarchical depth buffer algorithm. Our algorithm decouples depth values and coverage, and operates directly on the hierarchical depth buffer. It lets us efficiently parallelize both coverage computations and hierarchical depth buffer updates.

This code is mainly optimized for the AVX2 instruction set, and some AVX specific instructions are required for best performance. However, we also provide SSE 4.1 and SSE 2 implementations for backwards compatibility. The appropriate implementation will be chosen during run-time based on the CPU's capabilities.

Links:
- MaskedOcclusionCulling @ github
- Masked Software Occlusion Culling @Intel

36
BlazingDB is an extremely fast SQL database able to handle petabyte scale. BlazingDB requires a CUDA-enabled GPU with a CUDA compute capability of 3.0 or higher.

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Gathering petabytes of data about your customers is cool, but how can you take advantage of this data? BlazingDB lets you run high-performance SQL on a database using a ton of GPUs.

...

Relying on GPUs for a database is quite interesting. GPUs can run a ton of tasks in parallel and present a clear advantage for very specific tasks. In particular, companies have been using GPUs a lot lately for image processing and machine learning applications — but it’s the first time I’m hearing about taking advantage of GPUs for databases.

...

That’s where BlazingDB shines. You can do sums, use predicates and run through many, many database entries in little time. The company just started accepting customers in June 2016, and there are already big Fortune 100 companies that want to use BlazingDB.

Links:
- https://techcrunch.com/2016/09/12/blazingdb-uses-gpus-to-manipulate-huge-databases-in-no-time/
- http://blazingdb.com

37
iBow is a new project on kickstarter: it's a docking station with desktop grade graphics card for your 13/15-inch Macbook Pro and your Mac Mini.

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The design of iBow docking allows you to replace graphics cards easily according to your requirements to enhance the graphics experience. iBow was developed to accommodate the largest video cards currently available in the market.

Link: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1081921239/ibow-docking-station-boost-your-mac-with-extra-gra





38
3D-Tech News Around The Web / Optical Illusion: black dots
« on: September 12, 2016, 03:24:28 PM »
There are 12 black dots at intersections on this image but your brain won't let you see them all at once.



via: https://twitter.com/wkerslake/status/775105333333204992

39
3D-Tech News Around The Web / Oh shit, git!
« on: September 09, 2016, 06:35:03 PM »
Quote
Git is hard: screwing up is easy, and figuring out how to fix your mistakes is fucking impossible. Git documentation has this chicken and egg problem where you can't search for how to get yourself out of a mess, unless you already know the name of the thing you need to know about in order to fix your problem.

So here are some bad situations I've gotten myself into, and how I eventually got myself out of them in plain english.

Link: http://ohshitgit.com

40
3D-Tech News Around The Web / How a Frame is Rendered in DOOM (2016)
« on: September 09, 2016, 04:08:00 PM »
Quote
The new DOOM is a perfect addition to the franchise, using the new id Tech 6 engine where ex-Crytek Tiago Sousa now assumes the role of lead renderer programmer after John Carmack’s departure.
Historically id Software is known for open-sourcing their engines after a few years, which often leads to nice remakes and breakdowns. Whether this will stand true with id Tech 6 remains to be seen but we don’t necessarily need the source code to appreciate the nice graphics techniques implemented in the engine.

...

Unlike most Windows games released these days, DOOM doesn’t use Direct3D but offers an OpenGL and Vulkan backend.
Vulkan being the new hot thing and Baldur Karlsson having recently added support for it in RenderDoc, it was hard resisting picking into DOOM internals. The following observations are based on the game running with Vulkan on a GTX 980 with all the settings on Ultra, some are guesses others are taken from the Siggraph presentation by Tiago Sousa and Jean Geffroy.

Links:
- DOOM (2016) - Graphics Study
- idTech6 - SIGGRAPH 2016

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