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Topics - JeGX

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1
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Unreal Engine 4 is now available to everyone for free, and all future updates will be free!

You can download the engine and use it for everything from game development, education, architecture, and visualization to VR, film and animation. When you ship a game or application, you pay a 5% royalty on gross revenue after the first $3,000 per product, per quarter. It’s a simple arrangement in which we succeed only when you succeed.

This is the complete technology we use at Epic when building our own games. It scales from indie projects to high-end blockbusters; it supports all the major platforms; and it includes 100% of the C++ source code. Our goal is to give you absolutely everything, so that you can do anything and be in control of your schedule and your destiny. Whatever you require to build and ship your game, you can find it in UE4, source it in the Marketplace, or build it yourself – and then share it with others.

Link: https://www.unrealengine.com/blog/ue4-is-free

2
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Companies from Facebook Inc. to Sony Corp. and Google Inc. have spent billions of dollars investing in virtual-reality technology.

Now they have to turn it into a business. To get consumers to buy their devices, Sony, Facebook’s Oculus VR, Valve Corp. and Razer USA Ltd. need games to play and videos to watch. At this week’s Game Developers Conference in San Francisco, they’ll be trying to convince software makers there’s a market to be had.

...

“The market for virtual reality is very hot right now, and a lot of highly visible developers, designers and investors are placing bets,” van Dreunen said. “However, in the absence of solid delivery dates from the leading companies in the space, it is clear that virtual reality is not yet ready for prime time.”


Link: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-03-02/sony-woos-game-makers-to-ensure-demand-for-virtual-reality-gear

3
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Rays are fired from the camera out into the scene, bounce around according to physical models, and record when they hit a light source. Whenever anything changes, the scene has to be re-traced (it starts out noisy, but converges to the correct image).

Links:
- https://github.com/jonathanolson/tesserace
- http://jonathan-olson.com/tesserace/tests/3d.html

4
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Google's search engine currently uses the number of incoming links to a web page as a proxy for quality, determining where it appears in search results. So pages that many other sites link to are ranked higher. This system has brought us the search engine as we know it today, but the downside is that websites full of misinformation can rise up the rankings, if enough people link to them.

A Google research team is adapting that model to measure the trustworthiness of a page, rather than its reputation across the web. Instead of counting incoming links, the system – which is not yet live – counts the number of incorrect facts within a page.

link: http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg22530102.600-google-wants-to-rank-websites-based-on-facts-not-links.html

5
3D-Tech News Around The Web / The reasons why programmers don't blog
« on: February 27, 2015, 12:44:31 PM »
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Here’s a short summary of the reasons:

-    Time
-    “What I do is not interesting to others”
-    Perfectionism
-    Coding is better than writing
-    I’m not doing anything innovative
-    “I don’t do side projects”
-    “I don’t know what to write about”
-    shame
-    “what I want to write about is too obvious”
-    writing is harder than coding
-    everyone knows that already
-    longer feedback loop, as compared to coding

Full story: http://blog.arkency.com/2015/02/the-reasons-why-programmers-dont-blog/

6
3D-Tech News Around The Web / Qt3D 2.0: The FrameGraph
« on: February 27, 2015, 12:40:45 PM »
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or quite some time now, you’ve been hearing about Qt3D’s Framegraph. Although a brief definition of what the Framegraph is was given in the previous articles, this blog post will cover it in more detail. After reading this post, you will understand the difference between the Scenegraph and the Framegraph and see their respective uses. The more adventurous amongst you, will be able to pick up a pre-release version of Qt3D and start experimenting to see what the Framegraph can do for you.

Link: http://www.kdab.com/qt3d-2-0-framegraph/

8
3D-Tech News Around The Web / The state of Linux gaming in the SteamOS era
« on: February 26, 2015, 03:39:39 PM »
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Now, more than a year into the SteamOS era (measuring from that beta launch), the nascent Linux gaming community is cautiously optimistic about the promise of a viable PC gaming market that doesn't rely on a Microsoft OS. Despite technical and business problems that continue to get in the way, Valve has already transformed gaming on Linux from "practically nothing" to "definitely something" and could be on the verge of making it much more than that.

...

Though SteamOS' stabilizing influence has made Linux ports easier in many ways, there are still plenty of hurdles to getting games running smoothly on the platform. One of the big outstanding issues, even after years of concerted effort driven by Valve and hardware makers, is driver support.


Link: http://arstechnica.com/gaming/2015/02/the-state-of-linux-gaming-in-the-steamos-era/

9
3D-Tech News Around The Web / New features in Qt 5.5
« on: February 20, 2015, 05:20:45 PM »
Qt 5.5 will be shipped soon and here is a lit of the new features:

Quote

...

- Qt 3D
    - The Qt 3D module is now included as a technology preview.

- Qt Canvas 3D
    - Added Qt Canvas 3D module, a JavaScript 3D rendering API for Qt Quick.


- Qt Multimedia
    -  GStreamer 1.0 support. Note that the default is still 0.10. 1.0 support can be enabled by configuring Qt with ‘-gstreamer 1.0’.

...


Link: http://qt-project.org/wiki/New-Features-in-Qt-5.5

10
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"The rate of Linux development is unmatched," the foundation said in an announcement accompanying the report. "In fact, Linux kernel 3.15 was the busiest development cycle in the kernel’s history. This rate of change continues to increase, as does the number of developers and companies involved in the process. The average number of changes accepted into the kernel per hour is 7.71, which translates to 185 changes every day and nearly 1,300 per week. The average days of development per release decreased from 70 days to 66 days."

...

Each Linux release includes more than 10,000 patches from more than 1,400 developers and more than 200 corporations. "Since the 2.6.11 release, the top ten developers have contributed 36,664 changes—8.2 percent of the total. The top thirty developers contributed just over 17 percent of the total," the report said.

Complete story: http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2015/02/linux-has-2000-new-developers-and-gets-10000-patches-for-each-version/

11
3D-Tech News Around The Web / The Poor Man's Voxel Engine
« on: February 20, 2015, 03:16:59 PM »
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Clearly, this article is mostly useless if you're interested in writing your own voxel engine. The final result is far from perfect. I just want to share the petty drama of my past four and a half years. I for one thoroughly enjoy reading about other people's struggles. Maybe that's weird.

Full story: http://et1337.com/2015/02/18/the-poor-mans-voxel-engine/

Game engine: https://github.com/et1337/Lemma

12
3D-Tech News Around The Web / Persistent Mapped Buffers in OpenGL 4.4
« on: February 17, 2015, 09:11:40 PM »
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It appeared in ARB_buffer_storage and it become core in OpenGL 4.4. It allows you to map buffer once and keep the pointer forever. No need to unmap it and release the pointer to the driver... all the magic happens underneath.

Persistent Mapping is also included in modern OpenGL set of techniques called AZDO - Aproaching Zero Driver Overhead. As you can imagine, by mapping buffer only once we significantly reduce number of heavy OpenGL function calls and what's more important, fight synchronization problems.

Link: http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/872417/Persistent-Mapped-Buffers-in-OpenGL

13
3D-Tech News Around The Web / A beginner's guide to GitHub
« on: February 16, 2015, 08:42:55 PM »
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Let's be honest—if you're not hosting your source code on GitHub right now, your open source project pretty much doesn't exist. I have a lot of respect for solutions like Launchpad and BitBucket, but GitHub is still the place to go if you need a place to store and share your source code.

...

GitHub uses Git, which is a distributed revision control system designed and developed by Linus Torvalds for Linux kernel development back in 2005. Since then, it's become the most widely adopted version control system for software development there is.

Link: https://opensource.com/life/15/2/beginners-guide-github

14
The famous "Hello world" in 127 programming languages including ada, basic, boo, c, d, dart, erlang, groovy, latex, java, logo,  lua, processing, python,  rust, x86 (asm), zimbu.

Lua:
Code: [Select]
--[[
Hello, world!
]]
print 'Hello World!'

Zimbu:
Code: [Select]
FUNC Main() int
IO.print("Hello, World!")
RETURN 0
}


Rust:
Code: [Select]
fn main() {
println("hello, world");
}

Cobol:
Code: [Select]
IDENTIFICATION DIVISION.
PROGRAM-ID. HELLO-WORLD.
PROCEDURE DIVISION.
DISPLAY 'Hello, world'.
STOP RUN.

Ada:

procedure Hello is
Code: [Select]
begin
Put_Line ("Hello, world!");
end Hello;


Link: https://github.com/Prithvirajbilla/helloworld

15
3D-Tech News Around The Web / Revision 2015: 120Hz Demo Competition
« on: February 16, 2015, 03:03:51 PM »
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We're excited to announce a brand new special event at Revision 2015 - the 120hz demo competition.

John Carmack, famous game programmer and CTO of Oculus wants to see what nifty demos or effects you can write for 120hz LightBoost displays and is sponsoring a special prize.

Since this is a special competition and no currently affordable projection systems exist to showcase those kinds of productions on the Revision bigscreen we'll have a special booth in the infodesk area where everybody can sit down and watch the demos which will run in a continuous loop.

link: http://2015.revision-party.net/compos/120hz_demo_competition

16
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Right now, even with the astonishing power of current multi-core processors and graphics chipsets, the people we encounter in visually beautiful games like Far Cry 4, Assassin’s Creed: Unity and Tomb Raider lack something in their faces, some spark of humanity. The phenomenon has a well-known name, the Uncanny Valley, coined by robotics professor Masahiro Mori. His hypothesis, first put forward in 1970, was that as human reproductions get closer to authenticity, the tiny inaccuracies become increasingly disturbing. Video game characters look so real, but not real enough, and we recoil from them.

Video game worlds are similarly abstracted. The city of Los Santos in Grand Theft Auto V; the bustling Paris of Assassin’s Creed: Unity ... all the surface details are there, but these are just virtual film sets. Most of the doors are locked, and if you point GTA’s most powerful rocket launcher at any building, the explosive impact will do no damage at all. The computational cost of simulating collapsing masonry is huge.

Link: http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2015/feb/12/future-of-video-gaming-visuals-nvidia-rendering

17
3D-Tech News Around The Web / Normal generation in the pixel shader (GLSL)
« on: February 16, 2015, 01:39:47 PM »
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As usual, whilst working on one aspect of Avoyd I hit a hurdle and decided to take a break by tweaking some visuals - specifically looking at the normals for my surfaces. I added a step to generate face normals in the pixel shader using the derivatives of world space position, and immediately noticed precision issues when close to the surface. I'll demonstrate the issue and my quick fix which uses eye relative position instead of world space, before explaining what's happening in full.

Link: http://www.enkisoftware.com/devlogpost-20150131-1-Normal_generation_in_the_pixel_shader.html

18
3D-Tech News Around The Web / Keep a CHANGELOG
« on: February 16, 2015, 11:35:17 AM »
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A good change log sticks to these principles:

    It’s made for humans, not machines, so legibility is crucial.
    Easy to link to any section (hence Markdown over plain text).
    One sub-section per version.
    List releases in reverse-chronological order (newest on top).
    Write all dates in YYYY-MM-DD format. (Example: 2012-06-02 for June 2nd, 2012.) It’s international, sensible, and language-independent.
    Explicitly mention whether the project follows Semantic Versioning.
    Each version should:
        List its release date in the above format.
        Group changes to describe their impact on the project, as follows:
        Added for new features.
        Changed for changes in existing functionality.
        Deprecated for once-stable features removed in upcoming releases.
        Removed for deprecated features removed in this release.
        Fixed for any bug fixes.
        Security to invite users to upgrade in case of vulnerabilities.

Link: http://keepachangelog.com/

19
Some examples:

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-Waddress-of-array-temporary  :      "pointer is initialized by a temporary array, which will be destroyed at the end of the full-expression"

-Warray-bounds : array index %0 is past the end of the array (which contains %1 element%s2)

-Wc++11-compat : explicit instantiation cannot be 'inline'

-Wc++98-c++11-compat : use of this statement in a constexpr %select{function|constructor}0 is incompatible with C++ standards before C++1y

-Wdocumentation : not a Doxygen trailing comment

-Wheader-hygiene : using namespace directive in global context in header


All warnings: http://fuckingclangwarnings.com

20
3D-Tech News Around The Web / Matter.js: 2D Physics Engine for the web
« on: January 20, 2015, 01:24:27 PM »
Matter.js is a 2D rigid body physics engine for the web written in JavaScript.

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-  Physical properties (mass, area, density etc.)
-   Rigid bodies of any convex polygon
-   Stable stacking and resting
-   Collisions (broad-phase, mid-phase and narrow-phase)
-   Restitution (elastic and inelastic collisions)
-   Conservation of momentum
-   Friction and resistance
-   Constraints
-   Gravity
-   Composite bodies
-   Sleeping and static bodies
-   Events
-   Rounded corners (chamfering)
-   Views (translate, zoom)
-   Collision queries (raycasting, region tests)
-   Time scaling (slow-mo, speed-up)
-   Canvas renderer (supports vectors and textures)
-   WebGL renderer (requires pixi.js)
-   MatterTools for creating, testing and debugging worlds
-   World state serialisation (requires resurrect.js)
-   Cross-browser (Chrome, Firefox, Safari, IE8+)
-   Mobile-compatible (touch, responsive)
-   An original JavaScript physics implementation (not a port)

Links:
- DEMO
- Homepage
- Source code @ GitHub
 

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