ASUS PB287Q: 28-inch 4K UHD Monitor (3840×2160) with 10-bit True Color



ASUS PB287Q


ASUS announced a new 28-inch 4K ultra high definition (UHD) monitor (max resolution: 3840×2160 pixels)
with a 1ms GTG response time (GTG means grey to grey) and a 60Hz refresh rate. Like the Samsung’s UD590, ASUS PB287Q exploits a TN (twisted nematic) panel (better quality monitors have an IPS panel, IPS=In-Plane Switching, see here for more details) and is capable to display colors with 10-bit per channel (a channel = R, G, B or A). A 10-bit monitor is able to display up to 230 (1’073’741’824 or 1.07 billion) colors. Regular monitors (8-bit per channel) display only 224 (16’0777’216 or 16 million) colors…

I wonder how a HDR rendering looks like on such monitors?

PB287Q comes with the following connectors:
– one DisplayPort 1.2
– two HDMI 1.4
– one earphone jack
– one audio input (stereo speakers: 2W x 2 stereo RMS)

More information is available here: ASUS PB287Q homepage.

ASUS PB287Q

ASUS PB287Q






7 thoughts on “ASUS PB287Q: 28-inch 4K UHD Monitor (3840×2160) with 10-bit True Color”

  1. IGZO

    It’s a TN panel, it’s garbage junk crap. No TN panels can support 10bit colour.

    “Viewing Angle (CR≧10) : 170°(H)/160°(V)”

    IPS panels are 178°(H)/178°(V)

    Wait for a proper IGZO IPS panel 4K display.

  2. Jay Cox

    Uhm…

    8 bit color only means 16 million (2^24), not 4 billion (2^32). The alpha channel for 32 bit display isn’t a color channel, its a blending channel.

  3. Avlin

    can you write an article for a 10 bit complete toolchain setup ? driver/card/cable/screen

    Is intel HD graphic capable of 10 bit color ?

  4. Stefan

    other “cheap” 4K monitors
    Dell P2815Q
    Philips 288P6LJEB
    Samsung UD590

    Dell’s refresh rate is 30 Hz @ 3840×2160
    I assume the same for the other ones.

  5. jj99

    Too much hype for the 4K monitors I think. It’s a good evolution, but I would choose IPS over any TN, even 4K… IPS is the bigger ‘thing’ for me, even if less advertised. This monitor of course is clearly game oriented and may work great if the viewing angles are acceptable in practice.

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