(Tested) Fast Approximate Anti-Aliasing (FXAA) Demo (GLSL)





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4 – FXAA performance tests

The scene of the demo is quite light so we can easily see the impact of the FXAA. I managed to find a Radeon HD 2400 PRO just to see how FXAA works with this kind of card.

Testbed:
– CPU: Core i7 960 @ 3.2GHz
– RAM: 4GB DDR3 Corsair Dominator
– Motherboard: GIGABYTE X58-A UD5
– Windows 7 64-bit
– Graphics drivers: R270.51, Cat 11.2
– PSU: Corsair AX1200

ASUS HD 2400 – 1280×720 windowed
– FXAA disabled: 113FPS – 8.8 ms / frame
– FXAA enabled: 64FPS – 15.0 ms / frame
–> 15.0 – 8.8 = 6.2 ms for a 720p frame.

ASUS HD 2400 – 1920×1080 fullscreen
– FXAA disabled: 96FPS – 10.0 ms / frame
– FXAA enabled: 38FPS – 26.0 ms / frame
–> 26.0 – 10.8 = 16.0 ms for a 1080p frame.

AMD HD 5870 – 1280×720 windowed
– FXAA disabled: 2700FPS – 0.37 ms / frame
– FXAA enabled: 2080FPS – 0.48 ms / frame
–> 0.48 – 0.37 = 0.11 ms for a 720p frame.

AMD HD 5870 – 1920×1080 fullscreen
– FXAA disabled: 1780FPS –> 0.56 ms / frame
– FXAA enabled: 1220FPS –> 0.82 ms / frame
–> 0.82 – 0.56 = 0.26 ms for a 1080p frame.

SAPPHIRE HD 6970 – 1280×720 windowed
– FXAA disabled: 3120FPS –> 0.32 ms / frame
– FXAA enabled: 2320FPS –> 0.43 ms / frame
–> 0.43 – 0.32 = 0.11 ms for a 720p frame.

SAPPHIRE HD 6970 – 1920×1080 fullscreen
– FXAA disabled: 1780FPS –> 0.56 ms / frame
– FXAA enabled: 1320FPS –> 0.75 ms / frame
–> 0.75 – 0.56 = 0.19 ms for a 1080p frame.

EVGA GTX 480 – 1280×720 windowed
– FXAA disabled: 2980FPS –> 0.33 ms / frame
– FXAA enabled: 2200FPS –> 0.45 ms / frame
–> 0.45 – 0.33 = 0.12 ms for a 720p frame.

EVGA GTX 480 – 1920×1080 fullscreen
– FXAA disabled: 2420FPS –> 0.41 ms / frame
– FXAA enabled: 1170FPS –> 0.85 ms / frame
–> 0.85 – 0.41 = 0.44 ms for a 1080p frame.

EVGA GTX 580 SC – 1280×720 windowed
– FXAA disabled: 2980FPS –> 0.33 ms / frame
– FXAA enabled: 2450FPS –> 0.40 ms / frame
–> 0.40 – 0.33 = 0.07 ms for a 720p frame.

EVGA GTX 580 SC – 1920×1080 fullscreen
– FXAA disabled: 2680FPS –> 0.37 ms / frame
– FXAA enabled: 1360FPS –> 0.73 ms / frame
–> 0.73 – 0.37 = 0.36 ms for a 1080p frame.



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11 thoughts on “(Tested) Fast Approximate Anti-Aliasing (FXAA) Demo (GLSL)”

  1. JeGX Post Author

    It’s only this demo or it’s GeeXLab that does not run under Wine? Could you test ShaderToyMark? Or simpler, just launch GeeXLab under Wine.

  2. Timothy Lottes

    FYI, the source you grabbed is only the lowest quality FXAA v2 preset designed for the consoles.

    FXAA v1 (not tested here) for PC is MUCH higher quality!!

  3. JeGX Post Author

    @Thimothy: so I can’t wait to test the FXAA v1, if you plan to release it. In any case, FXAA v2 produces very acceptable results 😉

  4. Joakim Dahl

    A bit blurry result but for the simplicity in implementation it might very well be worth it. I’ll add this to my engine as well. Thanks for posting!

  5. simesgreen

    > based on AMD’s MLAA

    The original MLAA paper was by Intel.

  6. Licaon

    @JegX:
    ShaderToyMark ( http://pastebin.com/0jtV1my8 ) does not say anything just sits there
    GeeXLab ( http://pastebin.com/7wG3QnjZ ) as the FXAA demo it just says ‘Loading scene Fxaa_demo.xml in progress…’ while it actually crashes and hangs there until i kill it from htop, CTRL-C does not help as you can see.

    Other OpenGL apps work ok both natively and through WINE despite whatever error messages WINE spits.

    Debian Sid 64bit, WINE 1.3.17 ( from git ), nvidia GTX460 on 270.18.

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