[Tested and Burned] ASUS GeForce GTX 560 Ti DirectCU II TOP Review

ASUS GTX 560 Ti DCII TOP




ASUS ENGTX 560 Ti DirectCU II TOP Review Index


1 – ASUS GTX 560 Ti DirectCU II TOP: Presentation


1.1 – NVIDIA GeForce GTX 560 Ti Overview

NVIDIA GTX 560 Ti



The GeForce GTX 560 Ti is NVIDIA new gaming card based on the GF114 GPU. The GTX 560 Ti is the worthy successor of the GeForce GTX 460, a card wellknown for its overclocking capabilities.

GTX 560 Ti… Ti stands for Titanium, a low density (lightweight) and very resistant metal. For NVIDIA, the GTX 560 Ti has the same properties: small card for impressive performances.

Okay let’s see the features of this new card. The GF114 GPU is available with a reference clock of 822MHz. The GPU is made up of 8 SM (streaming multiprocessor or compute unit in OpenCL world), each SM having 48 CUDA cores, 4 dispatch units, 8 texture units and special function units. The GF114 features a total of 384 SP (CUDA cores) clocked at 1644MHz (twice the GPU core clock) and 64 texture units.

Unlike the GF104 GPU (GTX 460) which has only 7 SM (one SM has been disabled for power consumption reasons), the GF114 comes with all SMs enabled. This is possible thanks to serious optimizations at the transistor level. Thanks to these tweaks, NVIDIA has been able to significantly increase clock speeds while reducing electrical leakage.

The GTX 560 Ti embarks 1024MB of GDDR5 (four 64-bit memory controller for a total of 256-bit) graphics memory clocked at 4008MHz effective speed (or 2004MHz DDR speed like in GPU Caps Viewer or 1002MHz real speed like in GPU-Z, see here for more details about memory speeds).

NVIDIA has designed a reference board for the GTX 560 Ti with overclocking in mind. There is a robust 4-phase VRM for the GPU amd memory and the PCB is equiped with two 6-pin power connectors allowing a maximal power consumption of 3x75W = 225W (see here for more details: [TIPS] Maximum Power Consumption of Graphics Card Connectors).

The GTX 560 Ti has a TDP (thermal desing power, see here for more details) of 170W (at reference clocks).

Like the GTX 580, the GTX 560 Ti has the same power monitoring hardware (see here: GeForce GTX 580 Power Monitoring Details). But on the GeForce GTX 560 Ti, the power monitoring hardware is optional and graphics cards makers are free to implement it or not. Very nice as we’ll see it later… ;)

NVIDIA’s new baby will replace the GTX 470 and is positioned directly against the Radeon HD 6870 and even the Radeon HD 6950.

The GTX 560 Ti is a Direct3D 11 and OpenGL 4.1 capable graphics card. The card also supports OpenCL 1.1, the standard GPU computing API as well as CUDA, PhysX and DirectCompute.


1.2 – ASUS GTX 560 Ti DirectCU II TOP Overview

ASUS logo

ASUS’s ENGTX560 Ti DirectCU II TOP is a factory-overclocked GTX 560 Ti. The GF114 GPU is overclocked at 900MHz and these extra +78MHz / +10% (ref: 822MHz) clearly show the overclocking headroom of NVIDIA GTX 560 Ti. The 384 CUDA cores are clocked at 1800MHz and the 1024MB of GDDR5 memory are clocked at 4200MHz effective speed (ref: 4008MHz).

ASUS’s ENGTX560 Ti DirectCU II TOP comes with a customized PCB and VGA cooler. The cooling system, the DirectCU II or DCII, features 2 fans (one in NVIDIA reference cooler) and three copper heatpipes directly in contact with the GPU core:

ASUS GTX 560 Ti DCII TOP

ASUS GTX 560 Ti DCII TOP



All fundamental components of the power circuitry (chokes, capacitors and MOSFETs) have been chosen for overclocking:

ASUS GTX 560 Ti DCII TOP



The GTX 560 Ti reference board has a TDP of 170W at reference clocks. According to my tests, ASUS GTX 560 Ti DCII TOP has a TDP of around 190W due to the GPU clocked at 900MHz.

And guess what my friends? There’s no FurMark detection on ASUS’s GTX 560 Ti. You can burn the GF114 without limitation and this is a good news for GPU overclockrs!

How is it possible?

As I said in the GTX 560 Ti overview, the power monitoring hardware is optional and graphics cards are free to implement it or not. From my tests, ASUS GeForce GTX 560 Ti DirectCU II TOP does not implement the power monitoring hardware or has a customized power monitoring circuitry! This is a very great news for the overclocking community.

Here are some low resolution pictures of the GTX 560 Ti DCII TOP (high resolution pictures can be found here: ASUS GeForce GTX 560 Ti DirectCU II TOP Gallery (12 pictures total)):

ASUS GTX 560 Ti DCII TOP

ASUS GTX 560 Ti DCII TOP



This is a really nice card, well designed and I like the dark side of this GTX 560 Ti.

ASUS GTX 560 Ti DCII TOP comes with two LEDs on the back side of the PCB, near the power connectors that show if the card is properly fed or not: green: ok, orange (or red, I don’t know exactly): there’s a problem:

ASUS GTX 560 Ti DCII TOP



The bundle is reduced to the bare minimum (no geeky stuff) so no need to talk about it!

To end up this first part, here is the size of the GTX 560 Ti compared to the GeForce GTX 580 (here EVGA’s GTX 580 Superclocked):

ASUS GTX 560 Ti DCII TOP



ASUS ENGTX 560 Ti DirectCU II TOP Review Index


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