Bullet Physics 2.76 SDK Available



Bullet Physics SDK


The new version of Bullet Physics is out.

Bullet Physics is a professional open source (C++) collision detection, rigid body and soft body dynamics library. The library is free for commercial use under the ZLib license. Bullet is available for all major platforms including PS3, XBox 360, Wii, PC, Linux, Mac OSX and iPhone.

Bullet Physics will have an OpenCL hardware acceleration in the next major update (branch 3.xx). Version 2.76 prepares this OpenCL support with modifications in MiniCL (the OPenCL driver of Bullet).

You can download the last version of Bullet Physics SDK HERE.

Bullet Physics 2.76 new features:

  • New binary .bullet file format support, with 32/64bit little/big endian compatibility. See Bullet/Demos/SerializeDemo
  • New btCollisionWorld::contactTest and btCollisionWorld::contactPairTest query for immediate collision queries with a contact point callback. See Bullet/Demos/CollisionInterfaceDemo
  • New btInternalEdgeUtility to avoid unwanted collisions against internal triangle edge. See Bullet/Demos/InternalEdgeDemo
  • Improved MiniCL support in preparation for Bullet 3.x OpenCL support. See Bullet/Demos/MiniCL_VectorAdd
  • Improved CMake build system support, making Jam and other build systems obsolete
  • Many enhancements and bug fixes, see the issue tracked at bullet.googlecode.com

I hope to add Bullet Physics support to GeeXLab in order to offer an alternative to PhysX…

Bullet has been used in the blockbuster 2012:



This page gives some details about the use of Bullet in 2012:

This challenge led DD to develop a new simulation system called Drop. “Our software team built it around a fast, open-source engine called Bullet,” Leo says. “Bullet was the core solver, but we established a system for generating and breaking constraints and for assigning material properties to objects. That allowed us to do things that are very difficult for rigid body solvers, such as concave objects and organic shapes where collisions become very complicated. Drop is tremendously fast, and it allowed artists to iterate on a fairly long simulation in an hour or two. We were able to simulate tens of thousands of colliding objects.

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