Nov 2009 Steam Hardware Survey: Windows XP and GeForce 8800 Are the Most Popular



Steam Hardware Survey Nov 2009 - GPU
Steam Hardware Survey Nov 2009 - GPU


November 2009 edition of Valve’s Steam Hardware Survey is out. Here is a quick overview:

Top-5 graphics cards (DX10 GPU):
1 – NVIDIA GeForce 8800
2 – ATI Radeon HD 4800
3 – NVIDIA GeForce 9800
4 – NVIDIA GeForce 8600
5 – NVIDIA GeForce 9600

NVIDIA leads the market with 63.46% and ATI captures 28.97%. In the field of OS, Windows XP 32-bit is the most popular (47.97%), followed by Windows Vista 32-bit (20.98%) and Windows 7 64-bit (13.16%). It’s interesting to see that the most used NVIDIA drivers is the Forceware 191.07 (OpenGL 3.2) with more than 15%.


Steam Hardware Survey Nov 2009
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8 thoughts on “Nov 2009 Steam Hardware Survey: Windows XP and GeForce 8800 Are the Most Popular”

  1. Korvin77

    ha the most interesting! I was surprised that Win7 x64 uses more than x32 (x64 sucks – it slower, it eats more RAM and it has bad compability with software, I know I used Vista 64) but as we see, people use 13% Win7 64 and approx 13% of 4GB of RAM lol

  2. Jesse

    You’re ignoring the fact that Windows XP usage is on the decline. It’s been losing ground for months now. For the first time ever since Steam began, Windows XP has dropped below 50% usage. Windows 7 uptake has been accelerating on Steam and has reached 20%. The Steam December Survey should be out in a few more days, and I expect Windows XP and Vista to drop more and Windows 7 to increase more. I have kept track of the Steam stats in regards to Windows versions since September/2009, so I can back up my claims.

    @Korvin77
    Of course 64-bit operating systems use more RAM, as memory pointers eat up 64-bits instead of 32-bits, so you’ve got to use more RAM to store them. It also has pretty damn good compatibility, I can run all of my games on Steam just fine. And as far as speed is concerned, you’re offmark, I actually notice on average a 5% FPS increase in my games on Steam in Windows 7 x64 over Windows 7 x86 on the same hardware. Also note that RAM usage cannot be equated with performance. For example, searching using a hash table uses up far more memory than a simple array, but it’s magnitudes faster.

    Where Windows 7 x64 is going to be slower is on older hardware. If you don’t have at least 3GB of RAM, or you’re on an older single-core CPU, Windows 7 x64 is naturally going to be less performant. If you have 3GB or more of RAM, and a dual or quad core CPU, you should actually notice a slight speed increase. The reason being is that x86-64 CPUs in 64-bit mode have twice the number of general purpose registers than do x86 CPUs in 32-bit mode, and aren’t hitting the L1 cache as much to fetch data.

  3. Korvin77

    lol I have 2GB of RAM same as most STEAM users and Core2Duo 3.2GHz ( most users too) and it’s quite enough for Win7 x32 and all games what I play and it’s absolutely enough for work too 😉 but it’s absolutely not enough for x64 because of swapping and I know about registers but in reality most benchmarks talk us that x64 is slower (or we have parity at best) than x32 even if we use 4GB of RAM or more 😉 I’m going to buy system with Core i7 with 6GB of RAM soon and I’ll install probably some x64 LOL

  4. Jesse

    The December 2009 stats are now out.

    http://store.steampowered.com/hwsurvey/

    It appears I was correct. Windows XP 32-bit has dropped another 5.24% since the beginning of December. We saw a small shift over to Windows XP 64-bit, but it’s insignificant (0.13% increase). Windows 7 is picking up all of the slack.

    The death of Windows XP is accelerating month by month.

  5. H

    So where is Wine in all this? A ton of Linux users use Steam….at least they should have a write-in ‘Other’ section. That would be interesting…:)

  6. Jesse

    Wine reports itself as Windows XP 32-bit. There’s no way for Steam games to be able to tell they’re running on Wine. If Wine didn’t report itself as Windows XP 32-bit, it would break a lot of software that the Wine project supports.

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