Monthly Archives: June 2008

GPU-Z 0.2.5

GPU-Z is a lightweight utility designed to give you all information about your video card and GPU.

GPU-Z 0.2.5 Download

Revision History:
* Fixed BIOS Reading on HD 4870. Please do not flash non-128K BIOSes to GDDR5 cards
* Fixed GDDR5 bandwidth calculation
* Fixed texture fillrate on RV770 and RV730
* Added three extra on-die temperature sensors to RV770 monitoring
* Removed states.dmp file creation
* Fixed GPU activity readings on RV770
* Changed devices list order to be more intuitive (by bus number now)
* Added Shared Memory support, see the forum for more info
* Fixed more 190°C PCB readings on NVIDIA
* Catalyst Beta versions no longer displayed as version 2.2
* Fixed sensor graph overflow
* Sensor graphs will try to autoscale now
* Fixed RV505 process size
* Fixed memory bus width reading on some ATI RS300
* Fixed rare crash when reading NVIDIA sensors
* Fixed GDDR3 detection for G71

NVIDIA PhysX 8.06.12

The latest NVIDIA PhysX System Software is now available for download. This new version adds support for NVIDIA PhysX on GeForce 9800 GTX, GeForce GTX 280, and GeForce GTX 260 GPUs, including SLI configurations. The new system software is now also automatically included in the NVIDIA GeForce driver package as of version 177.39.

You can download NVIDIA PhysX 8.06.12 HERE.

Release Highlights:

  • Adds support for NVIDIA PhysX on GeForce 9800 GTX, GeForce GTX 280, and GeForce GTX 260 GPUs, including SLI configurations.
  • Experience GPU PhysX acceleration today by downloading the Unreal Tournament 3 PhysX Mod Pack.
  • Supports AGEIA PhysX processors and software runtimes (no change to PPU support).
  • Supports the following PhysX runtime engines: 2.8.1, 2.8.0, 2.7.4, 2.7.3, 2.7.2, 2.7.1, 2.7.0, 2.6.4, 2.6.3, 2.6.2, 2.6.1, 2.6.0, 2.5.1, 2.5.0, 2.4.4, 2.4.1, 2.4.0, 2.3.3, 2.3.2, 2.3.1
  • Includes the latest PhysX runtimes used in the latest game titles.
  • Developers: PhysX SDK 2.7.3 is required GeForce PhysX acceleration via CUDA 2.0.

GT200: Nvidia GeForce GTX 280 analysis

bit-tech.net has published a 15-page article on the analysis of the GT200 GPU architecture, with some words about CUDA and PhysX.

Read the complete article HERE.

The 240 thread processors are split down into ten thread processing clusters (TPCs), with each broken down into three streaming multiprocessors (SMs) or thread processing arrays (TPAs). Threads are assigned by the thread scheduler, which talks directly to each streaming multiprocessor through a dedicated instruction unit; this then assigns tasks to one of eight thread (or stream) processors.

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ATI Radeon HD 4850 Linux Performance

The chaps overs at Phoronix have analyzed the performance of the Radeon HD 4850 under Linux.

Read the complete article HERE.

While the ATI Radeon HD 4800 series was greeted with same-day Linux support, this first-cut Linux support clearly isn’t as well optimized as the Windows driver.
Alternatively, to this point they may have spent all of their resources tuning the DirectX performance and have forgone tuning the OpenGL side.

What’s the explanation for the Radeon HD 4850 on Linux falling so far behind their competitors? According to AMD engineers the Linux driver has yet to be well optimized.

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Benchmark Reviews 200K Contest

Benchmark Reviews organizes a GPU contest based on FurMark.

It wasn’t all that long ago that Benchmark Reviews was throwing a contest for when we reached 100,000 unique visitors, but since the staff and I have been putting in some long hours to produce a wide variety of content there has been a dramatic increase in visitors over the past several months. Our 200K contest grand prize winner will receive an XFX GeForce 8800 GS video card, and two runner-up winners will have their pick from several other items. This contest is open to anyone and everyone world wide.

Jump to the contest: Benchmark Reviews 200K Contest

NVIDIA PhysX runs on AMD Radeon 3870

After playing with Nvidia’s CUDA SDK and PhysX SDK, Eran Badit (NGOHQ.com) apparently got the PhysX layer to play along with Radeon cards. He mentioned that enabling PhysX support on Radeon cards is not particularly difficult, leading us to believe that physics on graphics cards may not so much be a technology problem but a game of politics.

Eran said that he will be offering the ATI PhysX-enabling utility on NGOHQ.com as soon as he gets his hands on more hardware to check the application on more than one graphics card. We are told that he is testing hardware already, which means that the software should be available “soon”.

Related Links:
TG Daily
NGOHQ
VR-Zone

Tesla 10 and CUDA 2.0: Technical Analysis and Performance

CUDA was announced along with G80 in November 2006, released as a public beta in February 2007, and then finally hit the Version 1.0 milestone in June 2007 along with the launch of the G80-based Tesla solutions for the HPC market. Today, Beyond3D looks at the next stage in the CUDA/Tesla journey: GT200-based solutions, CUDA 2.0, and the overall state of NVIDIA’s HPC business.

Read the article HERE.